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Effects of positive attitude on happiness and wage: Evidence from the US data

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  • Mohanty, Madhu S.

Abstract

Using samples from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979), a longitudinal data set from the United States, this study demonstrates that the worker's positive attitude affects his/her wage not only directly, but also indirectly through its effects on happiness. Assuming endogeneity of the positive attitude variable and estimating happiness and attitude equations simultaneously by a two-step procedure, the study further finds the evidence that happiness also affects the worker's earnings both directly and indirectly. These findings suggest that any attempt to raise workers' earnings potentials should focus not only on the development of their human capital endowments, but also on improvement of their attitudes.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohanty, Madhu S., 2009. "Effects of positive attitude on happiness and wage: Evidence from the US data," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 884-897, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:30:y:2009:i:6:p:884-897
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Miguel Lopes & Patricia Palma & Miguel e Cunha, 2011. "Tolerance is Not Enough: The Moderating Role of Optimism on Perceptions of Regional Economic Performance," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 102(2), pages 333-350, June.
    2. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2014. "It pays to be happy (if you are a man): Subjective wellbeing and the gender wage gap in Urban China," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(3), pages 392-414, May.
    3. Ertan Yörük, Ceren & Yörük, Barış K., 2012. "The impact of drinking on psychological well-being: Evidence from minimum drinking age laws in the United States," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1844-1854.
    4. Madhu S. Mohanty, 2016. "Effect of religious attendance on years of schooling in the USA," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 411-426, August.
    5. Mohanty, Madhu S. & Ullah, Aman, 2012. "Direct and indirect effects of happiness on wage: A simultaneous equations approach," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 143-152.
    6. Mohanty, Madhu Sudan, 2012. "Effects of positive attitude and optimism on wage and employment: A double selection approach," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 304-316.
    7. Marta Lachowska, 2017. "Outside options and wages: What can we learn from subjective assessments?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(1), pages 79-121, February.

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