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The clocks that time us are not the same: A theory of temporal diversity, task characteristics, and performance in teams

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  • Mohammed, Susan
  • Harrison, David A.

Abstract

Temporal individual differences are an under-explored, but research-worthy form of diversity in teams. Although persistent differences in how members think about and value time can profoundly influence team performance, the compositional impact of time-based individual differences is regularly overlooked. Optimal or suboptimal team performance can result because the composition of time-based individual differences is matched or unmatched (respectively) to task demands. Therefore, we offer a detailed presentation of how the configuration of four time-based individual differences (time urgency, time perspective, polychronicity, and pacing style) interact with two task typologies (task type and task complexity) to specify when elevation (mean) and diversity (dispersion) of temporal differences is helpful or harmful to team performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammed, Susan & Harrison, David A., 2013. "The clocks that time us are not the same: A theory of temporal diversity, task characteristics, and performance in teams," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 122(2), pages 244-256.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:122:y:2013:i:2:p:244-256
    DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2013.08.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. De Dreu, Carsten K. W., 2003. "Time pressure and closing of the mind in negotiation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 280-295, July.
    2. Hecht, Tracy D. & Allen, Natalie J., 2005. "Exploring links between polychronicity and well-being from the perspective of person-job fit: Does it matter if you prefer to do only one thing at a time?," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 155-178, November.
    3. Nandhakumar, Joe & Jones, Matthew, 2001. "Accounting for time: managing time in project-based teamworking," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 193-214, April.
    4. Tannenbaum, Scott I. & Mathieu, John E. & Salas, Eduardo & Cohen, Debra, 2012. "Teams Are Changing: Are Research and Practice Evolving Fast Enough?," Industrial and Organizational Psychology, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(01), pages 2-24, March.
    5. Jansen, Karen J. & Kristof-Brown, Amy L., 2005. "Marching to the beat of a different drummer: Examining the impact of pacing congruence," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 93-105, July.
    6. Wood, Robert E., 1986. "Task complexity: Definition of the construct," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 60-82, February.
    7. Kivetz, Yifat & Tyler, Tom R., 2007. "Tomorrow I'll be me: The effect of time perspective on the activation of idealistic versus pragmatic selves," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 193-211, March.
    8. Humphrey, Stephen E. & Moon, Henry & Conlon, Donald E. & Hofmann, David A., 2004. "Decision-making and behavior fluidity: How focus on completion and emphasis on safety changes over the course of projects," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 14-27, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kanfer, Ruth & Chen, Gilad, 2016. "Motivation in organizational behavior: History, advances and prospects," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 6-19.
    2. San Martin, Alvaro & Swaab, Roderick I. & Sinaceur, Marwan & Vasiljevic, Dimitri, 2015. "The double-edged impact of future expectations in groups: Minority influence depends on minorities’ and majorities’ expectations to interact again," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 49-60.

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