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From individual preference construction to group decisions: Framing effects and group processes

  • Milch, Kerry F.
  • Weber, Elke U.
  • Appelt, Kirstin C.
  • Handgraaf, Michel J.J.
  • Krantz, David H.
Registered author(s):

    Two choice tasks known to produce framing effects in individual decisions were used to test group sensitivity to framing, relative to that of individuals, and to examine the effect of prior, individual consideration of a decision on group choice. Written post-decision reasons and pre-decision group discussions were analyzed to investigate process explanations of choices made by preexisting, naturalistic groups. For a risky choice problem, a similar framing effect was observed for groups and individuals. For an intertemporal choice task where consumption was either delayed or accelerated, nave groups (whose members had not preconsidered the decision) showed a framing effect, less discounting in the delay frame, opposite to that observed in individuals. Predecided groups showed a non-significant effect in the other, expected direction. In all cases, process measures better explained variability in choices across conditions than frame alone. Implications for group decision research and design considerations for committee decisions are addressed.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 108 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 (March)
    Pages: 242-255

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:108:y:2009:i:2:p:242-255
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

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