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The role of demography in the long-run Yen/USD real exchange rate appreciation

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  • Aloy, Marcel
  • Gente, Karine

Abstract

This paper aims to measure the contribution of an aging population to explain the real appreciation experienced by the Yen-US Dollar since 1980s. We develop a two-good overlapping-generation model of a semi-small open economy to highlight the link between the birth rate and the real exchange rate. In a creditor (debtor) country, an aging population causes a real exchange rate appreciation (depreciation) due to a positive (negative) wealth effect. Structural parameters are estimated by GMM using quarterly data between 1960 and 2001. Then, numerical simulations show that the long-run relationship between population growth and real exchange rate is negative between 1960 and 1971 and positive between 1971 and 2000. The decrease in population growth may account for a large part of the real appreciation experienced by the Yen/USD between 1971 and 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Aloy, Marcel & Gente, Karine, 2009. "The role of demography in the long-run Yen/USD real exchange rate appreciation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 654-667, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:31:y:2009:i:4:p:654-667
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2014. "Real exchange rate determination and the China puzzle," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(2), pages 1-32, November.
    2. Rod Tyers, 2012. "Japanese Economic Stagnation: Causes and Global Implications," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(283), pages 517-536, December.
    3. Rod Tyers & Ying Zhang, 2011. "Japan’s Economic Recovery: Insights from Multi-Region Dynamics," CAMA Working Papers 2011-18, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    4. Kamrul Hassan & Ruhul Salim, 2011. "The linkage between relative population growth and purchasing power parity: Cross country evidence," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 10(2), pages 154-169, July.
    5. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:3:p:319-347 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hoarau, Jean-François, 2009. "L’approche microéconomique du taux de change réel d’équilibre : une revue de la littérature théorique," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 85(4), pages 403-436, décembre.

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