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What expenditure does Anglosphere foreign borrowing fund?

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  • Makin, Anthony J.
  • Narayan, Paresh Kumar
  • Narayan, Seema

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which foreign borrowing funds private investment, consumption and government expenditure in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand (the Anglosphere), advanced economies which have been the world's largest international borrowers since 1990. Using a bivariate predictive regression model, we estimate the relative importance of these expenditure aggregates as predictors of their external deficits, and hence foreign borrowing. Overall, based on quarterly macroeconomic data for the period 1990–2011, the evidence suggests that foreign borrowing has not financed higher household consumption in these economies over recent decades, with the possible exception of the United States. While results concerning government spending are mixed due to policy reaction, business cycle and public-private saving offset effects, strong results for private investment augur well for the sustainability of this grouping's foreign borrowing.

Suggested Citation

  • Makin, Anthony J. & Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Narayan, Seema, 2014. "What expenditure does Anglosphere foreign borrowing fund?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 63-78.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:40:y:2014:i:c:p:63-78
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jimonfin.2013.08.020
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    Cited by:

    1. Makin, Anthony J. & Ratnasiri, Shyama, 2015. "Competitiveness and government expenditure: The Australian example," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 154-161.
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    3. Smyth, Russell & Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2015. "Applied econometrics and implications for energy economics research," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 351-358.
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    7. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Ahmed, Huson Ali, 2014. "Importance of skewness in decision making: Evidence from the Indian stock exchange," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 260-269.
    8. Afees A. Salisu & Ahamuefula Ephraim Ogbonna & Paul Adeoye Omosebi, 2018. "Does the choice of estimator matter for forecasting? A revisit," Working Papers 053, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.
    9. Salisu, Afees A. & Isah, Kazeem O., 2018. "Predicting US inflation: Evidence from a new approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 134-158.
    10. Paresh Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2014. "Applied Econometrics and a Decade of Energy Economics Research," Monash Economics Working Papers 21-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    11. Salisu, Afees A. & Ademuyiwa, Idris & Isah, Kazeem O., 2018. "Revisiting the forecasting accuracy of Phillips curve: The role of oil price," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 334-356.
    12. Afees A. Salisu & Lateef O. Akanni & Rasheed O. Azeez, 2018. "Could this be a fiction? Bitcoin forecasts most tradable currency pairs better than ARFIMA," Working Papers 051, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.
    13. Salisu, Afees A. & Isah, Kazeem O., 2018. "Predicting US inflation: Evidence from a new approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 134-158.
    14. Sharma, Susan Sunila, 2016. "Can consumer price index predict gold price returns?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 269-278.
    15. Afees A. Salisu & Lateef O. Akanni & Ahamuefula Ephraim Ogbonna, 2018. "Forecasting CO2 emissions: Does the choice of estimator matter?," Working Papers 045, Centre for Econometric and Allied Research, University of Ibadan.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Expenditure; Current account deficits; Foreign borrowing; Anglosphere economies;

    JEL classification:

    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F47 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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