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The impacts of inclusive and exclusive taxes on healthy eating: An experimental study

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Xiu
  • Kaiser, Harry M.
  • Rickard, Bradley J.

Abstract

Based on a laboratory experiment conducted with 131 adults (non-students subjects), we empirically examine the differential impacts of an inclusive and exclusive tax on changing consumers’ eating behavior. We compare the caloric and nutrient content of the meals selected by the subjects using a difference-in-difference regression model to determine the efficacy of the policy treatments. The results indicate that an inclusive tax has a significantly stronger effect on reducing the consumption of total calories, calories from fat, and the intake of carbohydrates, cholesterol, sugar and sodium compared with an exclusive tax.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Xiu & Kaiser, Harry M. & Rickard, Bradley J., 2015. "The impacts of inclusive and exclusive taxes on healthy eating: An experimental study," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 13-24.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:56:y:2015:i:c:p:13-24
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2015.07.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Naomi E. Feldman & Bradley J. Ruffle, 2015. "The Impact of Including, Adding, and Subtracting a Tax on Demand," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 95-118, February.
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    4. Nadia A. Streletskaya & Pimbucha Rusmevichientong & Wansopin Amatyakul & Harry M. Kaiser, 2014. "Taxes, Subsidies, and Advertising Efficacy in Changing Eating Behavior: An Experimental Study," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 36(1), pages 146-174.
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    6. Nadia A. Streletskaya & Harry M. Kaiser, 2014. "Reply to Comment on Taxes, Subsidies, and Advertising Efficacy in Changing Eating Behavior: An Experimental Study," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 36(4), pages 722-726.
    7. Zhen Miao & John C. Beghin & Helen H. Jensen, 2012. "Taxing Sweets: Sweetener Input Tax Or Final Consumption Tax?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(3), pages 344-361, July.
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    10. Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård & Smed, Sinne, 2013. "The Danish tax on saturated fat – Short run effects on consumption, substitution patterns and consumer prices of fats," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 18-31.
    11. Jason M. Fletcher & David E. Frisvold & Nathan Tefft, 2011. "Are soft drink taxes an effective mechanism for reducing obesity?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(3), pages 655-662, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Burney, Shaheer, 2017. "The Impact of SNAP Participation on Sales of Carbonated Soda," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 259206, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:74:y:2018:i:c:p:138-142 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Wilson, Norbert L. W. & Zheng, Yuqing & Burney, Shaheer & Kaiser, Harry M., 2016. "Do Grocery Food Sales Taxes Cause Food Insecurity?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235324, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:71:y:2017:i:c:p:86-100 is not listed on IDEAS

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