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Investor mood, herding and the Ramadan effect

Listed author(s):
  • Gavriilidis, Konstantinos
  • Kallinterakis, Vasileios
  • Tsalavoutas, Ioannis
Registered author(s):

    In view of evidence linking herding and social mood, we examine whether the positive mood documented during Ramadan translates into higher herding compared to non-Ramadan days. Drawing on a sample of seven majority Muslim countries, we report significant herding during Ramadan in most of our sample markets. Additionally, we show that herding appears significantly stronger within rather than outside Ramadan for most tests whereby its significance is manifested on both Ramadan- and non-Ramadan-days. Overall, herding significance within/outside Ramadan exhibits some variation in its levels across markets in relation to variables reflective of market states, both domestically (market returns; market volume) and internationally (US market returns; US investors’ sentiment; global financial crisis) market states.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268115002619
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 132 (2016)
    Issue (Month): S ()
    Pages: 23-38

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:132:y:2016:i:s:p:23-38
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2015.09.018
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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