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Market stress and herding

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  • Hwang, Soosung
  • Salmon, Mark

Abstract

We propose a new approach to detecting and measuring herding which is based on the cross-sectional dispersion of the factor sensitivity of assets within a given market. This method enables us to evaluate if there is herding towards particular sectors or styles in the market including the market index itself and critically we can also separate such herding from common movements in asset returns induced by movements in fundamentals. We apply the approach to an analysis of herding in the US and South Korean stock markets and find that herding towards the market shows significant movements and persistence independently from and given market conditions and macro factors. We find evidence of herding towards the market portfolio in both bull and bear markets. Contrary to common belief, the Asian Crisis and in particular the Russian Crisis reduced herding and are clearly identified as turning points in herding behaviour.
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Suggested Citation

  • Hwang, Soosung & Salmon, Mark, 2004. "Market stress and herding," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 585-616, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:empfin:v:11:y:2004:i:4:p:585-616
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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