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Adolescent perceptions of parent and peer influences on teen purchase: An application of social power theory

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  • Goodrich, Kendall
  • Mangleburg, Tamara F.

Abstract

This study evaluates parental and peer influences on teen purchase decisions by applying social power theory, which has not been examined in the teen context. The conceptual model examines how family socialization practices might impact teens' perceptions of social power influences from parents and peers. For example, family communication environment may promote teens' reliance on particular bases of social power influence. This study also examines the relationship between the bases of perceived social power and the purchase of different types of products (e.g., luxury/necessity, public/private). Results are generally consistent with predictions, demonstrating that teens from high socio-oriented communication environments are subject to greater perceived peer reward/coercive and referent power, whereas teens from high concept-oriented communication environments perceive greater parental expert and legitimate power. Finally, perceived bases of social power influence differ depending on the type of product purchased. Interpretation of findings and implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Goodrich, Kendall & Mangleburg, Tamara F., 2010. "Adolescent perceptions of parent and peer influences on teen purchase: An application of social power theory," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(12), pages 1328-1335, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:12:p:1328-1335
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Elodie Gentina & Gregory M. Rose & Scott J. Vitell, 2016. "Ethics During Adolescence: A Social Networks Perspective," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 138(1), pages 185-197, September.
    2. Kastanakis, Minas N. & Balabanis, George, 2012. "Between the mass and the class: Antecedents of the “bandwagon” luxury consumption behavior," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(10), pages 1399-1407.
    3. Dawei Liu & Xiaohong Guo, 2017. "Exploring gender differences in acceptance of mobile computing devices among college students," Information Systems and e-Business Management, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 197-223, February.
    4. Helen Arce Salazar & Leon Oerlemans, 2016. "Do We Follow the Leader or the Masses? Antecedents of the Willingness to Pay Extra for Eco-Products," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(2), pages 286-314, July.
    5. Zhang, Guoquan & Shang, Jennifer & Yildirim, Pinar, 2016. "Optimal pricing for group buying with network effects," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 69-82.
    6. Annie Ng Cheng San & M. Krishna Moorthy & Choe Kum Lung, 2012. "Perceived Social Power and Audit Committee Effectiveness in Malaysia: The Conceptual Model," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 2(1), pages 162-175, January.
    7. Gentina, Elodie & Butori, Raphaëlle & Heath, Timothy B., 2014. "Unique but integrated: The role of individuation and assimilation processes in teen opinion leadership," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 83-91.

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