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Between the mass and the class: Antecedents of the “bandwagon” luxury consumption behavior

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  • Kastanakis, Minas N.
  • Balabanis, George

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of a number of psychological factors on consumers' propensity to engage in the “bandwagon” type of luxury consumption. It develops and empirically confirms a conceptual model of bandwagon consumption of luxury products. In general, results show that a consumer's interdependent self-concept underlies bandwagon luxury consumption. This relationship is mediated by the level of a consumer's status-seeking predispositions, susceptibility to normative influence and need for uniqueness. The study concludes that these psychological constructs explain well a large part of bandwagon luxury consumption and can be used as inputs in the development of marketing strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Kastanakis, Minas N. & Balabanis, George, 2012. "Between the mass and the class: Antecedents of the “bandwagon” luxury consumption behavior," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 65(10), pages 1399-1407.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:65:y:2012:i:10:p:1399-1407
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.10.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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