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Coordination and the fight against tax havens

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  • Konrad, Kai A.
  • Stolper, Tim B.M.

Abstract

The success or failure of the fight against tax havens is the outcome of a many player coordination game between a tax haven and its potential investors. Key determinants are the costly international pressure and the size of the haven country's revenue pool. The latter is determined endogenously by the decisions of many individual investors. Our analysis suggests a non-standard market model that explains why haven countries would ever comply with international standards of transparency despite the large empirically observable returns in the tax haven business. It also alludes to why service fees in tax havens can be positive despite a competitive financial market with multiple tax havens. Furthermore, we identify a trade-off between the fight against tax havens and high tax rates. Finally, low fines for disclosed offshore tax evasion, e.g. in special programs for tax evaders who voluntarily report their offshore wealth, strengthen haven countries against international pressure.

Suggested Citation

  • Konrad, Kai A. & Stolper, Tim B.M., 2016. "Coordination and the fight against tax havens," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 96-107.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:103:y:2016:i:c:p:96-107
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jinteco.2016.09.006
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    Cited by:

    1. Miethe, Jakob & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2017. "Dirty money coming home: Capital flows into and out of tax havens," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168082, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Thomas A. Gresik & Kai A. Konrad, 2017. "Tax Havens, Accounting Experts, and Fee-Setting Rules," CESifo Working Paper Series 6774, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Marcelo Arbex & Sidney Caetano, 2016. "Welfare Implications of AEoI," Working Papers 1608, University of Windsor, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Tax havens; Offshore tax evasion; International standards of transparency;

    JEL classification:

    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • H26 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Tax Evasion and Avoidance
    • H87 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - International Fiscal Issues; International Public Goods

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