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Human capital and economic growth in Spain, 1850-2000

  • Prados de la Escosura, Leandro
  • Rosés, Joan R.

We investigate human capital accumulation in Spain using income- and education-based alternative approaches. We, then, assess human capital impact on labor productivity growth and discuss the implications of its alternative measures for TFP growth. Trends in human capital are similar with either measure but the skill-premium approach fits better Spanish historical experience. As education is a high income elastic good, human capital growth computed with the education-based approach seems upward biased for the recent past. Human capital provided a positive albeit small contribution to labor productivity growth facilitating technological innovation.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014-4983(10)00032-X
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Explorations in Economic History.

Volume (Year): 47 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 520-532

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Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:47:y:2010:i:4:p:520-532
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622830

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