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Adolescents and electricity consumption; Investigating sociodemographic, economic, and behavioural influences on electricity consumption in households

Listed author(s):
  • Wallis, Hannah
  • Nachreiner, Malte
  • Matthies, Ellen
Registered author(s):

    With respect to changes in the energy systems of many countries, electricity consumption in households is an important topic. Extensive research has investigated the various determinants of electricity consumption. However, insights into how specific sociodemographic, behavioural, and attitudinal determinants influence residential electricity consumption are still scarce. In this study, we used hierarchical regression analysis to systematically investigate these determinants (including household engagement in electricity saving) along with a wide range of other measures in a sample of German households (N=763). Special attention was given to households with adolescents and children by analysing the influence of the number of adolescents on electricity consumption in a path model. Our results indicate that sociodemographic influences can be explained by the purchasing and use behaviours of residents. Our findings also suggest that the use of behavioural information provides a more detailed picture of the conditions of electricity consumption and thus allows for more appropriate policy planning.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421516301501
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 94 (2016)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 224-234

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:94:y:2016:i:c:p:224-234
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.03.046
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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