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Lifestyle factors in U.S. residential electricity consumption

Author

Listed:
  • Sanquist, Thomas F.
  • Orr, Heather
  • Shui, Bin
  • Bittner, Alvah C.

Abstract

A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral patterns associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanquist, Thomas F. & Orr, Heather & Shui, Bin & Bittner, Alvah C., 2012. "Lifestyle factors in U.S. residential electricity consumption," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 354-364.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:42:y:2012:i:c:p:354-364
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2011.11.092
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    References listed on IDEAS

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