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To use or not to use? An empirical study of pre-trip public transport information for business and leisure trips and comparison with car travel

  • Farag, Sendy
  • Lyons, Glenn
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    This quantitative study provides more insight into the relative strength of various factors affecting the use and non-use of pre-trip Public Transport (PT) information for business and leisure trips. It also illuminates comparing car with public transport and its consequences for mode choice. The factors affecting PT information use most strongly are travel behaviour and sociodemographics, but travel attitudes, information factors, and social surrounding also play a role. Public transport use and PT information use are closely connected, with travel behaviour having a stronger impact on information use than vice versa. Information service providers are recommended to market PT information simultaneously with public transport use.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X11000503
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2012)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 82-92

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:20:y:2012:i:c:p:82-92
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2011.03.007
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