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Responses to Transit Information among Car-drivers: Regret-based Models and Simulations

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Listed:
  • Caspar G. Chorus
  • Eric J. E. Molin
  • Bert Van Wee
  • Theo A. Arentze
  • Harry J. P. Timmermans

Abstract

This article investigates the use and effects of transit information among car drivers that consider transit as a mode-option in their choice set. It does so by first presenting a theoretical model of travel information use and effect, based on the integration of notions of Bayesian updating into a regret-based framework of travel choice. Subsequently, numerical simulation of the model provides insights into the mechanisms behind information use and effect in a mode-choice context where a traveler has both car-- as well as transit-options in their choice set, and prefers traveling by car over riding by transit. These simulations show that the perceived value of acquiring transit information is limited by a number of factors. Furthermore they demonstrate that, even in the case where transit information is acquired, and the message is favorable to transit, its impact on mode choices will also be limited. Given these results for non-habitual car-drivers, it is suggested that for car-drivers in general (thus including the large share of habitual drivers), conservative estimates regarding the impact of transit information provision on modal shift would be realistic.

Suggested Citation

  • Caspar G. Chorus & Eric J. E. Molin & Bert Van Wee & Theo A. Arentze & Harry J. P. Timmermans, 2006. "Responses to Transit Information among Car-drivers: Regret-based Models and Simulations," Transportation Planning and Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 249-271, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:transp:v:29:y:2006:i:4:p:249-271
    DOI: 10.1080/03081060600905434
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eran Ben-Elia & Robert Ishaq & Yoram Shiftan, 2013. "“If only I had taken the other road...”: Regret, risk and reinforced learning in informed route-choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 269-293, February.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1690-:d:112904 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Farag, Sendy & Lyons, Glenn, 2012. "To use or not to use? An empirical study of pre-trip public transport information for business and leisure trips and comparison with car travel," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 82-92.
    4. Sendy Farag & Glenn Lyons, 2010. "Explaining public transport information use when a car is available: attitude theory empirically investigated," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(6), pages 897-913, November.
    5. Casper G. Chorus & Harry J.P. Timmermans, 2011. "Personal Intelligent Travel Assistants," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Transport Economics, chapter 25 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Van Exel, N.J.A. & Rietveld, P., 2009. "Could you also have made this trip by another mode? An investigation of perceived travel possibilities of car and train travellers on the main travel corridors to the city of Amsterdam, The Netherland," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 374-385, May.
    7. Boeri, Marco & Longo, Alberto & Grisolía, José M. & Hutchinson, W. George & Kee, Frank, 2013. "The role of regret minimisation in lifestyle choices affecting the risk of coronary heart disease," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 253-260.
    8. Arnold van Exel, Nicolaas Jacob & Rietveld, Piet, 2010. "Perceptions of public transport travel time and their effect on choice-sets among car drivers," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 2(3), pages 75-86.

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