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Mobilizing cities towards a low-carbon future: Tambourines, carrots and sticks

  • Azevedo, Isabel
  • Delarue, Erik
  • Meeus, Leonardo

In the transition towards a low-carbon future in Europe, cities' actions are of major importance due to the prominence of urbanization, both in terms of population and in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, we need city authorities to act, by using their competences as policy makers as well as energy users. However, cities are still not moving as fast as one might expect, indicating the need for additional incentives to prompt local action. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present an overview of external incentives that might prompt cities to act and to highlight good practices that could be used in future initiatives.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

Volume (Year): 61 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 894-900

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Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:61:y:2013:i:c:p:894-900
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