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Multilevel risk governance and urban adaptation policy

Author

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  • Jan Corfee-Morlot

    ()

  • Ian Cochran
  • Stéphane Hallegatte
  • Pierre-Jonathan Teasdale

Abstract

Despite a flurry of activity in cities on climate change and growing interest in the research community, climate policy at city-scale remains fragmented and basic tools to facilitate good decision-making are lacking. This paper draws on an interdisciplinary literature review to establish a multilevel risk governance conceptual framework. It situates the local adaptation policy challenge and action within this to explore a range of institutional questions associated with strengthening local adaptation and related functions of local government. It highlights the value of institutional design to include analytic-deliberative practice, focusing on one possible key tool to support local decision-making-that of boundary organizations to facilitate local science-policy assessment. After exploring a number of examples of boundary organisations in place today, the authors conclude that a number of institutional models are valid. A common feature across the different approaches is the establishment of a science-policy competence through active deliberation and shared analysis engaging experts and decision-makers in an iterative exchange of information. Important features that vary include the geographic scope of operation and the origin of funding, the level and form of engagement of different actors, and the relationship with "producers" of scientific information. National and sub-national (regional) governments may play a key role to provide financial and technical assistance to support the creation of such boundary organizations with an explicit mandate to operate at local levels; in turn, in a number of instances boundary organizations have been shown to be able to facilitate local partnerships, engagement and decision-making on adaptation. While the agenda for multi-level governance of climate change is inevitably much broader than this, first steps by national governments to work with sub-national governments, urban authorities and other stakeholders to advanc
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Corfee-Morlot & Ian Cochran & Stéphane Hallegatte & Pierre-Jonathan Teasdale, 2011. "Multilevel risk governance and urban adaptation policy," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 169-197, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:104:y:2011:i:1:p:169-197
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-010-9980-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sippel, Maike & Jenssen, Till, 2009. "What about local climate governance? A review of promise and problems," MPRA Paper 20987, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Jan Corfee-Morlot & Lamia Kamal-Chaoui & Michael G. Donovan & Ian Cochran & Alexis Robert & Pierre-Jonathan Teasdale, 2009. "Cities, Climate Change and Multilevel Governance," OECD Environment Working Papers 14, OECD Publishing.
    3. Göran Therborn & K.C. Ho, 2009. "Introduction," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 53-62, March.
    4. Robert Falkner, 2003. "Private Environmental Governance and International Relations: Exploring the Links," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 3(2), pages 72-87, May.
    5. Carlo Aall & Kyrre Groven & Gard Lindseth, 2007. "The Scope of Action for Local Climate Policy: The Case of Norway," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 7(2), pages 83-101, May.
    6. Simon Shackley & Robert Deanwood, 2002. "Stakeholder Perceptions of Climate Change Impacts at the Regional Scale: Implications for the Effectiveness of Regional and Local Responses," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(3), pages 381-402.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nathan Engle, 2013. "The role of drought preparedness in building and mobilizing adaptive capacity in states and their community water systems," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 118(2), pages 291-306, May.
    2. Susan Hanson & Robert Nicholls & N. Ranger & S. Hallegatte & J. Corfee-Morlot & C. Herweijer & J. Chateau, 2011. "A global ranking of port cities with high exposure to climate extremes," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 89-111, January.
    3. Gawel, Erik & Heuson, Clemens & Lehmann, Paul, 2012. "Efficient public adaptation to climate change: An investigation of drivers and barriers from a Public Choice perspective," UFZ Discussion Papers 14/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
    4. Stéphane Hallegatte & Jan Corfee-Morlot, 2011. "Understanding climate change impacts, vulnerability and adaptation at city scale: an introduction," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 1-12, January.
    5. Alexandra Graham & Carrie L. Mitchell, 2016. "The role of boundary organizations in climate change adaptation from the perspective of municipal practitioners," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 139(3), pages 381-395, December.
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:6:p:1032-:d:101657 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Riyanti Djalante & Cameron Holley & Frank Thomalla & Michelle Carnegie, 2013. "Pathways for adaptive and integrated disaster resilience," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 69(3), pages 2105-2135, December.
    8. Stéphane Hallegatte & Fanny Henriet & Jan Corfee-Morlot, 2011. "The economics of climate change impacts and policy benefits at city scale: a conceptual framework," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 104(1), pages 51-87, January.
    9. repec:spr:masfgc:v:22:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11027-015-9697-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Samuel Fankhauser & Raluca Soare, 2013. "An economic approach to adaptation: illustrations from Europe," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 118(2), pages 367-379, May.
    11. Ingold, Karin, 2017. "How to create and preserve social capital in climate adaptation policies: A network approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 414-424.
    12. Lehmann, Paul & Brenck, Miriam & Gebhardt, Oliver & Schaller, Sven & Süßbauer, Elisabeth, 2012. "Understanding barriers and opportunities for adaptation planning in cities," UFZ Discussion Papers 19/2012, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Division of Social Sciences (ÖKUS).
    13. Bimal Raj Regmi & Cassandra Star & Walter Leal Filho, 2016. "An overview of the opportunities and challenges of promoting climate change adaptation at the local level: a case study from a community adaptation planning in Nepal," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 138(3), pages 537-550, October.
    14. repec:spr:masfgc:v:22:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11027-015-9699-z is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Pasimeni, Maria Rita & Petrosillo, Irene & Aretano, Roberta & Semeraro, Teodoro & De Marco, Antonella & Zaccarelli, Nicola & Zurlini, Giovanni, 2014. "Scales, strategies and actions for effective energy planning: A review," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 165-174.
    16. D. Reckien & J. Flacke & R. Dawson & O. Heidrich & M. Olazabal & A. Foley & J. Hamann & H. Orru & M. Salvia & S. Gregorio Hurtado & D. Geneletti & F. Pietrapertosa, 2014. "Climate change response in Europe: what’s the reality? Analysis of adaptation and mitigation plans from 200 urban areas in 11 countries," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 122(1), pages 331-340, January.
    17. Yingjiu Bai & Ikuyo Kaneko & Hikaru Kobayashi & Kazuo Kurihara & Izuru Takayabu & Hidetaka Sasaki & Akihiko Murata, 2014. "A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based approach to adaptation to regional climate change: a case study of Okutama-machi, Tokyo, Japan," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(5), pages 589-614, June.
    18. Castán Broto, Vanesa, 2017. "Urban Governance and the Politics of Climate change," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 1-15.

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