IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The TRIPS Agreement and Transfer of Climate-Change-Related Technologies to Developing Countries

  • Matthew Littleton
Registered author(s):

    Despite numerous international commitments to promote transfer of climate-change related technologies to developing countries, such transfers are not occurring at a sufficient rate to aid these nations in mitigating and adapting to the effects of climate change. The impact of the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) on transfer of these technologies is discussed through a detailed examination of relevant TRIPS provisions. The paper also addresses options for improving technology transfer through exploitation of existing TRIPS flexibilities, modification of the Agreement, and other public and private legal and policy avenues.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs in its series Working Papers with number 71.

    in new window

    Length: 48 pages
    Date of creation: Oct 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:71
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Rod Falvey & Neil Foster & David Greenaway, 2006. "Intellectual Property Rights and Economic Growth," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(4), pages 700-719, November.
    2. Steve Charnovitz, 2002. "The Legal Status of the Doha Declarations," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(1), pages 207-211, March.
    3. Paul A. David, 2004. "Can 'Open Science' be Protected from the Evolving Scheme of IPR Protections?," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 160(1), pages 9-, March.
    4. Ha-Joon Chang, 2001. "Intellectual Property Rights and Economic Development: Historical lessons and emerging issues," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 287-309.
    5. Keith E. Maskus, 2000. "Parallel Imports," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(9), pages 1269-1284, 09.
    6. Hoekman, Bernard M. & Maskus, Keith E. & Saggi, Kamal, 2004. "Transfer of technology to developing countries : unilateral and multilateral policy options," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3332, The World Bank.
    7. Smith, Pamela J., 2001. "How do foreign patent rights affect U.S. exports, affiliate sales, and licenses?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 411-439, December.
    8. Keith Maskus & Jerome Reichman, 2004. "The Globalization Of Private Knowledge Goods And The Privatization Of Global Public Goods," Journal of International Economic Law, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(2), pages 279-320, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:une:wpaper:71. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Aimee Gao)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.