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Regulatory Unilateralism: Arguments for Going It Alone on Climate Change

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  • Peter Drahos
  • Christian Downie

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  • Peter Drahos & Christian Downie, 2017. "Regulatory Unilateralism: Arguments for Going It Alone on Climate Change," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 8(1), pages 32-40, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:glopol:v:8:y:2017:i:1:p:32-40
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/1758-5899.12349
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karacaovali, Baybars & Limão, Nuno, 2008. "The clash of liberalizations: Preferential vs. multilateral trade liberalization in the European Union," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 299-327, March.
    2. Jason Dedrick & Kenneth L. Kraemer & Greg Linden, 2010. "Who profits from innovation in global value chains? A study of the iPod and notebook PCs," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 81-116, February.
    3. Azevedo, Isabel & Delarue, Erik & Meeus, Leonardo, 2013. "Mobilizing cities towards a low-carbon future: Tambourines, carrots and sticks," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 894-900.
    4. Richard G. Newell & William A. Pizer & Daniel Raimi, 2013. "Carbon Markets 15 Years after Kyoto: Lessons Learned, New Challenges," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 123-146, Winter.
    5. Zhang, Da & Karplus, Valerie J. & Cassisa, Cyril & Zhang, Xiliang, 2014. "Emissions trading in China: Progress and prospects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 9-16.
    6. Jim Watson & Rob Byrne & David Ockwell & Michele Stua, 2015. "Lessons from China: building technological capabilities for low carbon technology transfer and development," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 387-399, August.
    7. Marvin S. Soroos, 1994. "Global Change, Environmental Security, and the Prisoner's Dilemma," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 31(3), pages 317-332, August.
    8. Prema-chandra Athukorala & Nobuaki Yamashita, 2009. "Global Production Sharing and Sino-US Trade Relations," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 17(3), pages 39-56.
    9. Nuno Limao, 2006. "Preferential Trade Agreements as Stumbling Blocks for Multilateral Trade Liberalization: Evidence for the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 896-914, June.
    10. Robert N. Stavins, 1998. "What Can We Learn from the Grand Policy Experiment? Lessons from SO2 Allowance Trading," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 69-88, Summer.
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