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The intergenerational transmission of BMI in China

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  • Dolton, Peter
  • Xiao, Mimi

Abstract

Based on the China Health and Nutrition Survey longitudinal data from 1989 to 2009 and using BMI z-score as the measure of adiposity, we estimate the intergenerational transmission of BMI in China. The OLS estimates suggest that a one standard deviation increase in father's or mother's BMI is associated with an increase of around 20% in child's Body Mass Index (BMI) z-score. These estimates decrease to around 14% when we control for family fixed effects. We examine the heterogeneity of this BMI intergenerational transmission process across family income, parental occupation and poverty status and also find this intergenerational correlation tends to be higher among children of higher BMI levels, though this tendency becomes weaker as children approach adulthood.

Suggested Citation

  • Dolton, Peter & Xiao, Mimi, 2015. "The intergenerational transmission of BMI in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 90-113.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:19:y:2015:i:c:p:90-113
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2015.06.002
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    Cited by:

    1. Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude & Kugler, Adriana D., 2016. "Intergenerational persistence of health: Do immigrants get healthier as they remain in the U.S. for more generations?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 136-148.
    2. Dolton, Peter & Xiao, Mimi, 2017. "The intergenerational transmission of body mass index across countries," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 140-152.
    3. Classen, Timothy J. & Thompson, Owen, 2016. "Genes and the intergenerational transmission of BMI and obesity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 121-133.
    4. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:25:y:2017:i:c:p:65-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:emx:esteco:v:34:y:2019:i:2:p:159-196 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational; Adiposity; China; I15;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development

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