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Obesity and labor market outcomes in Mexico/Obesidad y el mercado de trabajo en México

Author

Listed:
  • Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez

    (El Colegio de México)

  • Roy Nuñez

    (Universidad de las Américas Puebla)

Abstract

Obesity has an adverse impact not only on health but also on the labor market outcomes of individuals. Using anthropometric data and the body mass index (BMI), we analyze the effects of obesity on the decision to work and the wages of Mexican workers aged 20-60. We use children's BMI as an instrumental variable for the BMI of their parents. Our results show that for men, BMI does not affect their decision to work or their wages. For women, however, an increase of one standard deviation in the BMI is associated with a 16% decrease in hourly wages. The findings are highly robust under different specifications.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez & Roy Nuñez, 2019. "Obesity and labor market outcomes in Mexico/Obesidad y el mercado de trabajo en México," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 34(2), pages 159-196.
  • Handle: RePEc:emx:esteco:v:34:y:2019:i:2:p:159-196
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    File URL: https://estudioseconomicos.colmex.mx/index.php/economicos/article/view/368/411
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nuñez, Roy, 2020. "Obesity and labor market in Peru," MPRA Paper 105621, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    body mass index; gender; labor; Mexico; wage penalty;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General

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