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Structural Change in the Impact of Income on Food Consumption in China, 1989-1993

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  • Guo, Xuguang
  • Mroz, Thomas A
  • Popkin, Barry M
  • Zhai, Fengying

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Guo, Xuguang & Mroz, Thomas A & Popkin, Barry M & Zhai, Fengying, 2000. "Structural Change in the Impact of Income on Food Consumption in China, 1989-1993," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(4), pages 737-760, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:v:48:y:2000:i:4:p:737-60
    DOI: 10.1086/452475
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Barry Popkin & Shu Wen Ng, 2007. "The nutrition transition in high‐ and low‐income countries: what are the policy lessons?," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 199-211, December.
    2. Colchero, M. Arantxa & Caballero, Benjamin & Bishai, David, 2008. "The effect of income and occupation on body mass index among women in the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Surveys (1983-2002)," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(9), pages 1967-1978, May.
    3. Hovhannisyan, Vardges & Gould, Brian W., 2010. "Quantifying the Structure of Food Demand in China Using a Generalized Quadratic AIDS Specification," 2010 Annual Meeting, February 6-9, 2010, Orlando, Florida 56422, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    4. Huang, Yingying & Tian, Xu, 2019. "Food accessibility, diversity of agricultural production and dietary pattern in rural China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 92-102.
    5. Jing You & Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha, 2014. "Decoding the Growth-Nutrition Nexus in China: Inequality, Uncertainty and Food Insecurity," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 20714, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    6. You, Jing & Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav, 2016. "Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 171-191.
    7. Fuller, Frank & Huang, Jikun & Ma, Hengyun & Rozelle, Scott, 2006. "Got milk? The rapid rise of China's dairy sector and its future prospects," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 201-215, June.
    8. Song, Feng & Reardon, Thomas & Tian, Xin & Lin, Chen, 2019. "The energy implication of China’s food system transformation," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 240(C), pages 617-629.
    9. Popkin, Barry M. & Horton, Susan & Kim, Soowon, 2001. "The nutritional transition and diet-related chronic diseases in Asia," FCND briefs 105, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Shimokawa, Satoru & Pinstrup-Andersen, Per, 2006. "Economic Growth, Lifestyle Changes, and the Coexistence of Under and Overweight in China: A Semiparametric Approach," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21334, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Nie, Peng & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso & He, Xiaobo, 2015. "Peer effects on childhood and adolescent obesity in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 47-69.
    12. Liu, Hong & Fang, Hai & Zhao, Zhong, 2013. "Urban–rural disparities of child health and nutritional status in China from 1989 to 2006," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 294-309.
    13. Vardges Hovhannisyan & Sachintha Mendis & Chris Bastian, 2019. "An econometric analysis of demand for food quantity and quality in urban China," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 50(1), pages 3-13, January.
    14. Ng, Shu Wen & Zhai, Fengying & Popkin, Barry M., 2008. "Impacts of China's edible oil pricing policy on nutrition," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 414-426, January.
    15. Curtis, Kynda R. & McCluskey, Jill J. & Wahl, Thomas I., 2007. "Consumer preferences for western-style convenience foods in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 1-14.
    16. Zheng, Zhihao & Henneberry, Shida Rastegari, 2012. "Estimating the impacts of rising food prices on nutrient intake in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1090-1103.
    17. Popkin, Barry M. & Ng, Shu Wen, 2006. "The Nutrition Transition in High and Low-Income Countries: What are the Policy Lessons?," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25493, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    18. Dolton, Peter & Xiao, Mimi, 2015. "The intergenerational transmission of BMI in China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 90-113.
    19. Tian, Xu & Yu, Xiaohua, 2015. "Using semiparametric models to study nutrition improvement and dietary change with different indices: The case of China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 67-81.

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