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Economic development and family structure: From pater familias to the nuclear family

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  • Pensieroso, Luca
  • Sommacal, Alessandro

Abstract

We provide a theory of the interaction between intergenerational living arrangements and economic development. We show that, when technical progress is fast enough, the economy experiences a shift from stagnation to growth, there is a transition from coresidence to non-coresidence, and the social status of the elderly tends to deteriorate.

Suggested Citation

  • Pensieroso, Luca & Sommacal, Alessandro, 2014. "Economic development and family structure: From pater familias to the nuclear family," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 80-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:71:y:2014:i:c:p:80-100
    DOI: 10.1016/j.euroecorev.2014.07.001
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    Cited by:

    1. David de la Croix & Faustine Perrin, 2016. "French Fertility and Education Transition: Rational Choice vs. Cultural Diffusion," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016007, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. Luca Pensieroso & Alessandro Sommacal, 2017. "Agriculture to Industry: the End of Intergenerational Coresidence," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2017007, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Growth theory; Intergenerational living arrangements; Bargaining power; Family economics;

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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