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The Allocation of Resources in Intergenerational Households: Adult Children and Their Elderly Parents

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  • Pezzin, Liliana E
  • Schone, Barbara Steinberg

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  • Pezzin, Liliana E & Schone, Barbara Steinberg, 1997. "The Allocation of Resources in Intergenerational Households: Adult Children and Their Elderly Parents," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 460-464, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:87:y:1997:i:2:p:460-64
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pollak, Robert A, 1976. "Interdependent Preferences," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 309-320.
    2. Bernheim, B Douglas, 1994. "A Theory of Conformity," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(5), pages 841-877, October.
    3. Alessie, Rob & Kapteyn, Arie, 1991. "Habit Formation, Interdependent References and Demographic Effects in the Almost Ideal Demand System," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(406), pages 404-419, May.
    4. Lindbeck, Assar, 1995. " Welfare State Disincentives with Endogenous Habits and Norms," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 97(4), pages 477-494, December.
    5. George A. Akerlof, 1980. "A Theory of Social Custom, of which Unemployment may be One Consequence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 749-775.
    6. Schelling, Thomas C, 1969. "Models of Segregation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 488-493.
    7. Kapteyn, Arie & Wansbeek, Tom, 1982. "Empirical evidence on preference formation," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 137-154, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Liliana Pezzin & Robert Pollak & Barbara Schone, 2009. "Long-term care of the disabled elderly: do children increase caregiving by spouses?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 323-339, September.
    2. Matteo Lippi Bruni & Cristina Ugolini, 2016. "Delegating home care for the elderly to external caregivers? An empirical study on Italian data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, pages 155-183.
    3. Atsue Mizushima, 2008. "Intergenerational Transfers of Time and Public Long-term Care with an Aging Population," Economics Working Papers ECO2008/36, European University Institute.
    4. Lisa Cameron & Deborah Cobb-Clark, 2008. "Do coresidency and financial transfers from the children reduce the need for elderly parents to works in developing countries?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 1007-1033, October.
    5. Mizushima, Atsue, 2009. "Intergenerational transfers of time and public long-term care with an aging population," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, pages 572-581.
    6. Julie Zissimopoulos, 2001. "Resource Transfers to the Elderly: Do Adult Children Substitute Financial Transfers for Time Transfers?," Working Papers 01-05, RAND Corporation.
    7. Hsin-Ling Hsieh & Shin-Yi Chou & Echu Liu & Hsien-Ming Lien, 2015. "Strengthening or Weakening? The Impact of Universal Health Insurance on Intergenerational Coresidence in Taiwan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 883-904, June.
    8. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2013. "Informal Care and intergenerational transfers in European Countries," Working Papers 2013-25, FEDEA.
    9. Madden, D. & Walker, I., 1999. "Labour Supply, Health and Caring: Evidence from the UK," Papers 99/28, College Dublin, Department of Political Economy-.
    10. Liliana E. Pezzin & Robert A. Pollak & Barbara S. Schone, 2007. "Efficiency in Family Bargaining: Living Arrangements and Caregiving Decisions of Adult Children and Disabled Elderly Parents," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 53(1), pages 69-96, March.
    11. Caroliniana S. Padgett & R. Corey Remle, 2016. "Financial Assistance Patterns from Midlife Parents to Adult Children: A Test of the Cumulative Advantage Hypothesis," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 435-449, September.
    12. Anjan Mukherji, 2005. "Robust cyclical growth," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, pages 233-246.
    13. Guodong Chen & Xiaoyan Lei, 2009. "“Fertility effect” or “supporting effect?”—Quantity of children and parental health," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, pages 601-616.
    14. Cameron, L. & Cobb-Clark, D., 2001. "Old-Age Support in Developing Countries: Labor Supply, Ingenerational Transfers and Living Arrangements," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 773, The University of Melbourne.
    15. Lippi Bruni Matteo & Ugolini Cristina, 2006. "Assistenza a domicilio e assistenza residenziale: politiche di intervento e analisi empirica," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, pages 241-268.
    16. Emiko Takagi & Merril Silverstein, 2011. "Purchasing Piety? Coresidence of Married Children With Their Older Parents in Japan," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(4), pages 1559-1579, November.
    17. Wolff, François-Charles, 2006. "Les transferts ascendants au Bangladesh, une décision familiale?," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 82(1), pages 271-316, mars-juin.
    18. Melanie Arntz & Jochen Michaelis & Alexander Spermann, 2006. "Reforming Long-term Care in Germany," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(V), pages 37-42.
    19. Francisca Antman, 2007. "Who Cares for the Elderly? Intrafamily Resource Allocation and Migration in Mexico," Discussion Papers 06-031, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    20. Jellal, Mohamed & Wolff, Francois-Charles, 2002. "Cultural evolutionary altruism: theory and evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 241-262, June.

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