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Economic incentives for financial and residential independence

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  • Leslie Whittington

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  • H. Elizabeth Peters

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Leslie Whittington & H. Elizabeth Peters, 1996. "Economic incentives for financial and residential independence," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(1), pages 82-97, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:33:y:1996:i:1:p:82-97
    DOI: 10.2307/2061715
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Moffitt, Robert, 1992. "Incentive Effects of the U.S. Welfare System: A Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 1-61, March.
    2. Sheldon Danziger & George Jakubson & Saul Schwartz & Eugene Smolensky, 1982. "Work and Welfare as Determinants of Female Poverty and Household Headship," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 97(3), pages 519-534.
    3. Mroz, Thomas A, 1987. "The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 765-799, July.
    4. Becketti, Sean, et al, 1988. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics after Fourteen Years: An Evaluatio n," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(4), pages 472-492, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Clara H. Mulder & William A.V. Clark & Michael Wagner, 2002. "A comparative analysis of leaving home in the United States, the Netherlands and West Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(17), pages 565-592, December.
    2. Fenaba Addo, 2014. "Debt, Cohabitation, and Marriage in Young Adulthood," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(5), pages 1677-1701, October.
    3. Sara LaLumia & James Sallee, 2013. "The value of honesty: empirical estimates from the case of the missing children," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(2), pages 192-224, April.
    4. Jacob, Marita & Kleinert, Corinna, 2007. "Does unemployment help or hinder becoming independent? : the role of employment status for leaving the parental home," IAB Discussion Paper 200705, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Giulia Ferrari & Alessandro Rosina & Emiliano Sironi, 2014. "Beyond Good Intentions: The Decision-Making Process of Leaving the Family of Origin in Italy," Working Papers 060, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    6. Aslan Zorlu & Ruben Gaalen, 2016. "Leaving Home and Destination of Early Nest Leavers: Ethnicity, Spaces and Prices," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 267-291, May.
    7. Deborah Cobb-Clark & David Ribar, 2012. "Financial stress, family relationships, and Australian youths’ transitions from home and school," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 469-490, December.
    8. Jordan Matsudaira, 2016. "Economic conditions and the living arrangements of young adults: 1960 to 2011," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 167-195, January.
    9. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    10. Aslan Zorlu & Clara Mulder, 2011. "Ethnic Differences in Leaving Home: Timing and Pathways," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 49-72, February.
    11. Jordan D. Matsudaira, 2016. "Economic conditions and the living arrangements of young adults: 1960 to 2011," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 167-195, January.
    12. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & David C. Ribar, 2009. "Financial Stress, Family Conflict, and Youths’ Successful Transition to Adult Roles," CEPR Discussion Papers 627, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    13. Setsuya Fukuda, 2009. "Leaving the parental home in post-war Japan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 20(30), pages 731-816, June.
    14. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark, 2008. "Leaving Home: What Economics Has to Say about the Living Arrangements of Young Australians," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(2), pages 160-176, June.
    15. Lee, Kwan Ok & Painter, Gary, 2013. "What happens to household formation in a recession?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 93-109.
    16. Steven J. Haider & Kathleen McGarry, 2005. "Recent Trends in Resource Sharing Among the Poor," NBER Working Papers 11612, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Pensieroso, Luca & Sommacal, Alessandro, 2014. "Economic development and family structure: From pater familias to the nuclear family," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 80-100.
    18. Larrimore, Jeff & Schuetz, Jenny & Dodini, Samuel, 2016. "What are the Perceived Barriers to Homeownership for Young Adults?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-021, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    19. Steven Garasky, 2000. "Understanding the Employment Experiences and Migration Patterns of Rural Youth and Young Adults," JCPR Working Papers 143, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    20. Brigitte Dormont & Sandrine Dufour-Kippelen, 2000. "Insertion professionnelle et autonomie résidentielle : le cas des jeunes peu diplômés," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 337(1), pages 97-120.

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