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How did structural reform influence inflation in transition economies?

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  • Barlow, David

Abstract

This paper empirically examines the contribution of structural reforms to reducing inflation using a panel data-set of 25 transition economies. Two econometric methodologies are applied. First, the Blundell and Bond (1998) estimator for panel data incorporating lags of the dependent variable. Second, a panel logit estimator is employed to consider the likelihood of achieving low inflation. Results highlight the importance of price and trade liberalization and the reform of credit allocation for reducing inflation, the latter being especially important for bringing inflation below 10%.

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  • Barlow, David, 2010. "How did structural reform influence inflation in transition economies?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 198-210, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:34:y:2010:i:2:p:198-210
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chengsi Zhang & Ke Song & Fang Wang, 2015. "Economic Globalization and Inflation in China: A Multivariate Approach," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 23(3), pages 79-96, May.
    2. Pavle Petrovic & Zorica Mladenovic & Aleksandra Nojkovic, 2011. "Inflation Triggers in Transition Economies: Their Evolution and Specific Features," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(5), pages 101-124, September.
    3. Borek Vašícek, 2011. "Inflation Dynamics and the New Keynesian Phillips Curve in Four Central European Countries," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(5), pages 71-100, September.
    4. Borek Vašícek, 2011. "Inflation Dynamics and the New Keynesian Phillips Curve in Four Central European Countries," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(5), pages 71-100, September.
    5. Horváth, Roman & Komárek, Luboš & Rozsypal, Filip, 2011. "Does money help predict inflation? An empirical assessment for Central Europe," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 523-536.
    6. Égert, Balázs, 2011. "Catching-up and inflation in Europe: Balassa-Samuelson, Engel's Law and other culprits," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 208-229, June.
    7. Pavle Petrovic & Zorica Mladenovic & Aleksandra Nojkovic, 2011. "Inflation Triggers in Transition Economies: Their Evolution and Specific Features," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(5), pages 101-124, September.

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