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The Penn Effect and Transition: The New EU Member States in International Perspective

  • Richard Frensch

    ()

    (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, University of Regensburg, Landshuter Str. 4, Regensburg 93047, Germany.)

  • Achim Schmillen

    ()

    (Institute for Employment Research, Institute for East and Southeast European Studies, Regensburger Str. 104, Nuremberg 90478, Germany.)

We aim to put comparative price developments of transition economies in an international perspective. We argue that estimating simple price-productivity relationships without the inclusion of other explanatory factors connected to reform effort might severely bias estimates for CEEC and CIS economies. Our results imply that, when controlling for reform effort and therefore avoiding this endogeneity problem, the price-productivity elasticity for CEEC and CIS economies was not different from that of non-transition economies during the first 15 years of transition.

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Article provided by Palgrave Macmillan & Association for Comparative Economic Studies in its journal Comparative Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 55 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 99-119

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Handle: RePEc:pal:compes:v:55:y:2013:i:1:p:99-119
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  1. JamesR. Lothian & MarkP. Taylor, 2008. "Real Exchange Rates Over the Past Two Centuries: How Important is the Harrod-Balassa-Samuelson Effect?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(532), pages 1742-1763, October.
  2. Mohsin S. Khan & Ehsan U. Choudhri, 2004. "Real Exchange Rates In Developing Countries; Are Balassa-Samuelson Effects Present?," IMF Working Papers 04/188, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Bergin, Paul R. & Glick, Reuven & Taylor, Alan M., 2006. "Productivity, tradability, and the long-run price puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 2041-2066, November.
  4. Yanping Chong & Òscar Jordà & Alan M. Taylor, 2010. "The Harrod-Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis: Real Exchange Rates and their Long-Run Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 15868, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Evžen Kočenda & Jan Hanousek, 2010. "Divide and Privatize : Firms Break-up and Performance," Working Papers 291, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
  6. Richard Frensch, 2000. "Internal Liberalization as a Barrier To Export-led Recovery in Central European Countries Preparing For EU Accession," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 42(3), pages 31-47, September.
  7. Martin Cincibuch & Jiří Podpiera, 2006. "Beyond Balassa-Samuelson: Real appreciation in tradables in transition countries," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 14(3), pages 547-573, 07.
  8. Gilles DUFRENOT & Balazs Egert, 2003. "Real Exchange Rates in Central and Eastern Europe : What Scope for the Underlying Fundamentals?," Development and Comp Systems 0309001, EconWPA.
  9. Maeso-Fernandez, Francisco & Osbat, Chiara & Schnatz, Bernd, 2005. "Pitfalls in estimating equilibrium exchange rates for transition economies," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 130-143, June.
  10. Jarko Fidrmuc, 2009. "Gravity models in integrated panels," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 435-446, October.
  11. Coricelli, Fabrizio & Jazbec, Bostjan, 2004. "Real exchange rate dynamics in transition economies," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 83-100, March.
  12. Richard Frensch, 2006. "Balassa-Samuelson, Product Differentiation and Transition," Working Papers 266, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
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