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Openness and Inflation: Theory and Evidence

Listed author(s):
  • David Romer

Because unanticipated monetary expansion leads to real exchange rate depreciation, and because the harms of real depreciation are greater in more open economies, the benefits of unanticipated expansion are decreasing in the degree of openness. Models in which the absence of precommitment in monetary policy leads to excessive inflation therefore predict lower average inflation in more open economies. This paper tests this prediction using cross-country data. The data show a strong and robust negative link between openness and inflation.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/2118453
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Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 108 (1993)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 869-903

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Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:108:y:1993:i:4:p:869-903.
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  1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
  2. Fair, Ray C, 1987. "International Evidence on the Demand for Money," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(3), pages 473-480, August.
  3. Barro, Robert J. & Gordon, David B., 1983. "Rules, discretion and reputation in a model of monetary policy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 101-121.
  4. Laurence Ball & David Romer, 1990. "Real Rigidities and the Non-Neutrality of Money," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(2), pages 183-203.
  5. Alberto Alesina, 1988. "Macroeconomics and Politics," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1988, Volume 3, pages 13-62 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Sheffrin, S.M., 1988. "Two Tests Of Rational Partisan Business Cycle Theory," Papers 54, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
  7. Fischer, Stanley, 1990. "Rules versus discretion in monetary policy," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 21, pages 1155-1184 Elsevier.
  8. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-491, June.
  9. Driscoll, Michael J & Lahiri, Ashok, K, 1983. "Income-Velocity of Money in Agricultural Developing Economies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 393-401, August.
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