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Dynamic binary outcome models with maximal heterogeneity

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  • Browning, Martin
  • Carro, Jesus M.

Abstract

Most econometric schemes to allow for heterogeneity in micro behavior have two drawbacks: they do not fit the data and they rule out interesting economic models. In this paper we consider the time homogeneous first order Markov (HFOM) model that allows for maximal heterogeneity. That is, the modeling of the heterogeneity does not impose anything on the data (except the HFOM assumption for each agent) and it allows for any theory model (that gives a HFOM process for an individual observable variable). ‘Maximal’ means that the joint distribution of initial values and the transition probabilities is unrestricted.

Suggested Citation

  • Browning, Martin & Carro, Jesus M., 2014. "Dynamic binary outcome models with maximal heterogeneity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 178(2), pages 805-823.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:178:y:2014:i:2:p:805-823
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jeconom.2013.11.005
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Plum, Alexander & Ayllón, Sara, 2015. "Heterogeneity in unemployment state dependence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 85-87.
    2. Victor Aguirregabiria & Jiaying Gu & Yao Luo, 2018. "Sufficient Statistics for Unobserved Heterogeneity in Structural Dynamic Logit Models," Papers 1805.04048, arXiv.org.
    3. Martin Browning & Jesus M. Carro, 2013. "The Identification of a Mixture of First-Order Binary Markov Chains," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 75(3), pages 455-459, June.
    4. Manuel Arellano & Stéphane Bonhomme, 2017. "Nonlinear Panel Data Methods for Dynamic Heterogeneous Agent Models," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 471-496, September.
    5. Bester, C. Alan & Hansen, Christian B., 2016. "Grouped effects estimators in fixed effects models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 190(1), pages 197-208.
    6. Stéphane Bonhomme & Elena Manresa, 2012. "Grouped Patterns of Heterogeneity in Panel Data," Working Papers wp2012_1208, CEMFI.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Discrete choice; Markov processes; Nonparametric identification; Unemployment dynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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