IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ect/emjrnl/v13y2010i1p1-39.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Heterogeneity in dynamic discrete choice models

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Browning
  • Jesus M. Carro

Abstract

We consider dynamic discrete choice models with heterogeneity in both the levels parameter and the state dependence parameter. We first present an empirical analysis that motivates the theoretical analysis which follows. The theoretical analysis considers a simple two-state, first-order Markov chain model without covariates in which both transition probabilities are heterogeneous. Using such a model we are able to derive exact small sample results for bias and mean squared error (MSE). We discuss the maximum likelihood approach and derive two novel estimators. The first is a bias corrected version of the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) although the second, which we term MIMSE, minimizes the integrated mean square error. The MIMSE estimator is always well defined, has a closed-form expression and inherits the desirable large sample properties of the MLE. Our main finding is that in almost all short panel contexts the MIMSE significantly outperforms the other two estimators in terms of MSE. A final section extends the MIMSE estimator to allow for exogenous covariates. Copyright (C) The Author(s). Journal compilation (C) Royal Economic Society 2010.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Browning & Jesus M. Carro, 2010. "Heterogeneity in dynamic discrete choice models," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 13(1), pages 1-39, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ect:emjrnl:v:13:y:2010:i:1:p:1-39
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1368-423X.2009.00301.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Browning & Mette Ejrnæs & Javier Alvarez, 2010. "Modelling Income Processes with Lots of Heterogeneity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(4), pages 1353-1381.
    2. Manuel Arellano, 2003. "Discrete choices with panel data," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 27(3), pages 423-458, September.
    3. Hashem Pesaran, M. & Yamagata, Takashi, 2008. "Testing slope homogeneity in large panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 50-93, January.
    4. Carro, Jesus M., 2007. "Estimating dynamic panel data discrete choice models with fixed effects," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(2), pages 503-528, October.
    5. Bo E. Honoré & Elie Tamer, 2002. "Bounds on Parameters in Dynamic Discrete Choice Models," CAM Working Papers 2004-23, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics, revised Aug 2004.
    6. Jinyong Hahn & Whitney Newey, 2004. "Jackknife and Analytical Bias Reduction for Nonlinear Panel Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(4), pages 1295-1319, July.
    7. Arellano, Manuel & Honore, Bo, 2001. "Panel data models: some recent developments," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 53, pages 3229-3296 Elsevier.
    8. MacKinnon, James G. & Smith Jr., Anthony A., 1998. "Approximate bias correction in econometrics," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 205-230, August.
    9. Bo E. Honoré & Ekaterini Kyriazidou, 2000. "Panel Data Discrete Choice Models with Lagged Dependent Variables," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(4), pages 839-874, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arthur Lewbel, 2006. "Modeling Heterogeneity," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 650, Boston College Department of Economics.
    2. Stefan Hochguertel & Henry Ohlsson, 2011. "Wealth mobility and dynamics over entire individual working life cycles," BCL working papers 56, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    3. Browning, Martin & Carro, Jesus M., 2014. "Dynamic binary outcome models with maximal heterogeneity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 178(2), pages 805-823.
    4. Erik Biørn & Hild-Marte Bjørnsen, 2015. "What motivates farm couples to seek off-farm labour? A logit analysis of job transitions," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 42(2), pages 339-365.
    5. Pauline Givord & Lionel Wilner, 2015. "When Does the Stepping‐Stone Work? Fixed‐Term Contracts Versus Temporary Agency Work in Changing Economic Conditions," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(5), pages 787-805, August.
    6. Tue Gorgens & Dean Hyslop, 2016. "The specification of dynamic discrete-time two-state panel data models," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2016-631, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    7. Martin Browning & Jesus Carro, 2006. "Heterogeneity and Microeconometrics Modelling," CAM Working Papers 2006-03, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
    8. Fabio Berton & Francesco Devicienti & Lia Pacelli, 2011. "Are temporary jobs a port of entry into permanent employment?: Evidence from matched employer-employee," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(8), pages 879-899, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ect:emjrnl:v:13:y:2010:i:1:p:1-39. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/resssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.