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Induced technological change in a multi-regional, multi-sectoral, integrated assessment model (WIAGEM): Impact assessment of climate policy strategies

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  • Kemfert, Claudia

Abstract

This paper illustrates the representation of induced technological change in the multi- regional, multi-sectoral integrated assessment model WIAGEM. The main aim of this paper is to investigate quantitatively economic impacts of climate policy measures due to induced technological changes that are considered. Improved technological innovations are triggered by increased R&D expenditures that advance energy efficiencies. Model results show that induced technological changes due to increased investment in R&D reduce compliance costs. Although R&D expenditures compete with other investment expenditures, we find that increased R&D expenditures improve energy efficiency that substantially lowers abatement costs. Without the inclusion of induced technological changes, emission targets are primarily reached by production declines, resulting in overall welfare reductions. With the inclusion of induced technological changes, emission mitigations can achieve fewer production drawbacks. Technological spill over effects also lead to improved terms of trade effects.
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  • Kemfert, Claudia, 2005. "Induced technological change in a multi-regional, multi-sectoral, integrated assessment model (WIAGEM): Impact assessment of climate policy strategies," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 293-305, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:54:y:2005:i:2-3:p:293-305
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    Cited by:

    1. Bosetti, Valentina & Carraro, Carlo & Massetti, Emanuele & Tavoni, Massimo, 2008. "International energy R&D spillovers and the economics of greenhouse gas atmospheric stabilization," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 2912-2929, November.
    2. Kemfert, Claudia & Truong, Truong, 2007. "Impact assessment of emissions stabilization scenarios with and without induced technological change," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5337-5345, November.
    3. Michael Hübler, 2015. "A theory-based discussion of international technology funding," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(2), pages 313-327, April.
    4. Valentina Bosetti & Carlo Carraro & Marzio Galeotti, 2006. "Stabilisation Targets, Technical Change and the Macroeconomic Costs of Climate Change Control," Working Papers 2006.2, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Peterson, Sonja, 2005. "Technischer Fortschritt im DART-Modell," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 3806, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Balázs Lengyel, 2010. "The Hungarian ICT sector – a comparative CEE perspective with special emphasis on structural change," EIIW Discussion paper disbei183, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    7. Hübler, Michael & Baumstark, Lavinia & Leimbach, Marian & Edenhofer, Ottmar & Bauer, Nico, 2012. "An integrated assessment model with endogenous growth," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 118-131.
    8. Ashina, Shuichi & Fujino, Junichi & Masui, Toshihiko & Ehara, Tomoki & Hibino, Go, 2012. "A roadmap towards a low-carbon society in Japan using backcasting methodology: Feasible pathways for achieving an 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 584-598.
    9. Dai, Hancheng & Masui, Toshihiko & Matsuoka, Yuzuru & Fujimori, Shinichiro, 2012. "The impacts of China’s household consumption expenditure patterns on energy demand and carbon emissions towards 2050," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 736-750.
    10. Marzio Galeotti & Carlo Carraro, 2004. "Does Endogenous Technical Change Make a Difference in Climate Policy Analysis? A Robustness Exercise with the FEEM-RICE Model," Working Papers 2004.152, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    11. Taran Faehn and Elisabeth T. Isaksen, 2016. "Diffusion of Climate Technologies in the Presence of Commitment Problems," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2).
    12. Cantore, Nicola, 2012. "Sustainability of the energy sector in the Mediterranean region," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 423-430.
    13. Nicola Cantore, 2005. "Reconsidering the Environmental Kuznets Curve hypothesis: the trade off between environment and welfare," Working Papers 13, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    14. Enrica De Cian, 2006. "International Technology Spillovers in Climate-Economy Models: Two Possible Approaches," Working Papers 2006.141, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C6 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • D5 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium

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