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Why has for-profit colleges’ share of higher education expanded so rapidly? Estimating the responsiveness to labor market changes

Author

Listed:
  • Gilpin, Gregory A.
  • Saunders, Joseph
  • Stoddard, Christiana

Abstract

Over the last two decades, for-profit colleges (FPCs) have substantially increased their share of the higher education market. One potential explanation is that FPC sector may be more responsive to labor market changes than public competitors. Using panel datasets of Associate's degree students, we examine the effects of changes in labor market conditions across various employment fields on enrollment and degree completion in related majors. The results indicate that enrollment and degree completion in the FPC sector is positively related to employment growth and wages in related occupations, while public institutions remain largely unresponsive. Heterogeneity analysis reveals that these relationships are similar across groups of students by gender and ethnicity. Furthermore, the results also indicate that students in public institutions are non-responsive to changes in labor markets associated with requiring an Associate's or Bachelor's degree.

Suggested Citation

  • Gilpin, Gregory A. & Saunders, Joseph & Stoddard, Christiana, 2015. "Why has for-profit colleges’ share of higher education expanded so rapidly? Estimating the responsiveness to labor market changes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 53-63.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:45:y:2015:i:c:p:53-63
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2014.11.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Armona, Luis & Chakrabarti, Rajashri & Lovenheim, Michael, 2017. "How does for-profit college attendance affect student loans, defaults, and labor market outcomes?," Staff Reports 811, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Sep 2018.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Enrollment; Community colleges; Degree completion; For-profit colleges;

    JEL classification:

    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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