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Do Employers Prefer Workers Who Attend For-Profit Colleges? Evidence from a Field Experiment

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Listed:
  • Rajeev Darolia
  • Cory Koedel
  • Paco Martorell
  • Katie Wilson
  • Francisco Perez-Arce

Abstract

This paper reports results from a resume-based field experiment designed to examine employer preferences for job applicants who attended for-profit colleges. For-profit colleges have seen sharp increases in enrollment in recent years despite alternatives such as public community colleges being much cheaper. We sent almost 9,000 fictitious resumes of young applicants who recently completed their schooling to online job postings in six occupational categories and tracked employer callback rates. We find no evidence that employers prefer applicants with resumes listing a for-profit college relative to those whose resumes list either a community college or no college at all.

Suggested Citation

  • Rajeev Darolia & Cory Koedel & Paco Martorell & Katie Wilson & Francisco Perez-Arce, 2014. "Do Employers Prefer Workers Who Attend For-Profit Colleges? Evidence from a Field Experiment," Working Papers WR-1054, RAND Corporation.
  • Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:wr-1054
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    7. Stefan Eriksson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2014. "Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 1014-1039, March.
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    11. Lang, Kevin & Weinstein, Russell, 2013. "The wage effects of not-for-profit and for-profit certifications: Better data, somewhat different results," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 230-243.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jepsen, Christopher & Mueser, Peter R. & Jeon, Kyung-Seong, 2016. "The Benefits of Alternatives to Conventional College: Labor-Market Returns to Proprietary Schooling," IZA Discussion Papers 10007, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Hinrichs, Peter, 2014. "What Kind of Teachers Are Schools Looking For? Evidence from a Randomized Field Experiment," Working Papers (Old Series) 1436, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:9:p:2855-75 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Judd Kessler & Corinne Low & Colin D. Sullivan, 2019. "Incentivized Resume Rating: Eliciting Employer Preferences without Deception," Working Papers 2019-039, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    5. Stephanie R. Cellini & Rajeev Darolia & Lesley J. Turner, 2016. "Where Do Students Go when For-Profit Colleges Lose Federal Aid?," NBER Working Papers 22967, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gilpin, Gregory A. & Saunders, Joseph & Stoddard, Christiana, 2015. "Why has for-profit colleges’ share of higher education expanded so rapidly? Estimating the responsiveness to labor market changes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 53-63.
    7. Eric P. Bettinger & Lindsay Fox & Susanna Loeb & Eric S. Taylor, 2017. "Virtual Classrooms: How Online College Courses Affect Student Success," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(9), pages 2855-2875, September.
    8. Armona, Luis & Chakrabarti, Rajashri & Lovenheim, Michael, 2017. "How does for-profit college attendance affect student loans, defaults, and labor market outcomes?," Staff Reports 811, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, revised 01 Sep 2018.
    9. Stephanie Riegg Cellini & Nicholas Turner, 2016. "Gainfully Employed? Assessing the Employment and Earnings of For-Profit College Students Using Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 22287, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Rajeev Darolia, 2015. "Messengers of Bad News or Bad Apples? Student Debt and College Accountability," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 10(2), pages 277-299, March.
    11. repec:eee:pubeco:v:159:y:2018:i:c:p:183-202 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:63:y:2018:i:01:n:s0217590818410023 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Boyd-Swan, Casey & Herbst, Chris M., 2017. "The Demand for Teacher Characteristics in the Market for Child Care: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 10702, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Rajeev Darolia & Cory Koedel & Paco Martorell & Katie Wilson & Francisco Perez-Arce, 2016. "Race and gender effects on employer interest in job applicants: new evidence from a resume field experiment," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(12), pages 853-856, August.
    15. repec:spr:reihed:v:59:y:2018:i:7:d:10.1007_s11162-017-9491-x is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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