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Siblings and gender differences in African-American college attendance

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  • Loury, Linda Datcher

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  • Loury, Linda Datcher, 2004. "Siblings and gender differences in African-American college attendance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 213-219, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:23:y:2004:i:3:p:213-219
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel Aaronson, 1998. "Using Sibling Data to Estimate the Impact of Neighborhoods on Children's Educational Outcomes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(4), pages 915-946.
    2. Robert Kaestner, 1997. "Are Brothers Really Better? Sibling Sex Composition and Educational Achievement Revisited," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(2), pages 250-284.
    3. Behrman, Jere R & Pollak, Robert A & Taubman, Paul, 1989. "Family Resources, Family Size, and Access to Financing for College Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(2), pages 398-419, April.
    4. Heckman, James J, 1995. "Lessons from the Bell Curve," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 1091-1120, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Altmejd, Adam & Barrios-Fernandez, Andres & Drlje, Marin & Goodman, Joshua & Hurwitz, Michael & Kovac, Dejan & Mulhern, Christine & Neilson, Christopher & Smith, Jonathan, 2020. "O brother, where start thou? Sibling spillovers on college and major choice in four countries," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108440, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Goodman, Joshua & Hurwitz, Michael & Smith, Jonathan & Fox, Julia, 2015. "The relationship between siblings’ college choices: Evidence from one million SAT-taking families," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 75-85.
    3. Christopher Cornwell & David B. Mustard & Jessica Van Parys, 2013. "Noncognitive Skills and the Gender Disparities in Test Scores and Teacher Assessments: Evidence from Primary School," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 48(1), pages 236-264.
    4. Joshua S. Goodman & Michael Hurwitz & Christine Mulhern & Jonathan Smith, 2019. "O Brother, Where Start Thou? Sibling-Spillovers in College Enrollment," CESifo Working Paper Series 7974, CESifo.
    5. Goodman, Joshua & Hurwitz, Michael & Smith, Jonathan & Fox, Julia, 2016. "Reprint of “The relationship between siblings’ college choices: Evidence from one million SAT-taking families”," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 125-135.

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