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Can stability of foreign aid agreement reduce global income inequality?

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  • Berrittella, Maria

Abstract

Global initiatives on debt relief call for increasing foreign aid assistance to alleviate income inequality. But the potential gains from foreign aid policy coordination may be limited by the willing participation of diverse and self-interested donor countries. If stability of the foreign aid agreement does not occur, then aid effectiveness fails. Thus, the aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the stability of foreign aid agreement on income redistribution amongst countries. The findings show that stability has positive effects on income mobility from the rich to the poorest countries reducing global income inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Berrittella, Maria, 2017. "Can stability of foreign aid agreement reduce global income inequality?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 105-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecanpo:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:105-111
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eap.2017.03.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sulemana, Iddisah & Kpienbaareh, Daniel, 2018. "An empirical examination of the relationship between income inequality and corruption in Africa," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 27-42.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Computable general equilibrium model; Foreign aid; Global income inequality; Stability;

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism

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