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The design and communication of systematic monetary policy strategies

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  • Levin, Andrew T.

Abstract

The efficacy of central bank communications is inextricably linked to the characteristics of the monetary policy framework. Therefore, this paper presents a set of fundamental principles regarding the joint design of monetary policy strategy and communications. The practical implications of these principles are illustrated by considering a number of significant policy challenges faced by central banks in the advanced economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Levin, Andrew T., 2014. "The design and communication of systematic monetary policy strategies," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 52-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:49:y:2014:i:c:p:52-69
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2014.09.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Refet S. Gurkaynak & Andrew T. Levin & Andrew N. Marder & Eric T. Swanson, 2007. "Inflation targeting and the anchoring of inflation expectations in the western hemisphere," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 25-47.
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    6. Taylor, John B. & Williams, John C., 2010. "Simple and Robust Rules for Monetary Policy," Handbook of Monetary Economics, in: Benjamin M. Friedman & Michael Woodford (ed.),Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 15, pages 829-859, Elsevier.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gael Price & Amber Wadsworth, 2019. "Effective monetary policy committee deliberation in New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 82, pages 1-18, April.
    2. Bin Grace Li & Stephen A. O'Connell & Christopher S Adam & Andrew Berg & Peter J Montiel, 2016. "VAR meets DSGE; Uncovering the Monetary Transmission Mechanism in Low-Income Countries," IMF Working Papers 16/90, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Michael D. Bordo, 2017. "An Historical Perspective on the Quest for Financial Stability and the Monetary Policy Regime," Economics Working Papers 17108, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.
    4. Pongsak Luangaram & Warapong Wongwachara, 2017. "More Than Words: A Textual Analysis of Monetary Policy Communication," PIER Discussion Papers 54, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Feb 2017.
    5. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew T. Levin, 2015. "Labor Market Slack and Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 21094, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ali Alichi & Kevin Clinton & Charles Freedman & Ondra Kamenik & Michel Juillard & Douglas Laxton & Jarkko Turunen & Hou Wang, 2015. "Avoiding Dark Corners; A Robust Monetary Policy Framework for the United States," IMF Working Papers 15/134, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central Bank independence; Inflation targeting; Simple monetary policy rules;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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