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Monetary Unions and External Shocks


  • Etienne Farvaque

    () (University of Lille 1)

  • Norimichi Matsueda

    () (Kwansei Gakuin University)


According to Bordo and James (2008), history shows that multinational monetary unions have dissolved mainly under the consequences of external shocks. This paper focuses on the effects of external shocks in assessing the sustainability of a monetary union and provides a theoretical argument that confirms their point.

Suggested Citation

  • Etienne Farvaque & Norimichi Matsueda, 2009. "Monetary Unions and External Shocks," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 1483-1491.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00202

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Frankel, Jeffrey A & Rose, Andrew K, 1998. "The Endogeneity of the Optimum Currency Area Criteria," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(449), pages 1009-1025, July.
    2. Michael D. Bordo & Harold James, 2008. "A Long Term Perspective on the Euro," NBER Working Papers 13815, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Corinne Aaron-Cureau & Hubert Kempf, 2006. "Bargaining over monetary policy in a monetary union and the case for appointing an independent central banker," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(1), pages 1-27, January.
    4. Rudi Dornbusch & Carlo Favero & Francesco Giavazzi, 1998. "Immediate challenges for the European Central Bank," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 13(26), pages 15-64, April.
    5. Rudiger Dornbusch & Carlo A. Favero & Francesco Giavazzi, 1998. "The Immediate Challenges for the European Central Bank," NBER Working Papers 6369, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Frankel, Jeffrey A. & Rose, Andrew K., 1997. "Is EMU more justifiable ex post than ex ante?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 753-760, April.
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    More about this item


    Monetary Union; Optimum Currency Areas; External Shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit


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