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Making Employment Equity Programs Work for Women

  • Joanne D. Leck
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    Women continue to be undervalued in employment, both in terms of the positions they occupy and the wages they receive. Employment Equity Programs (EEPs) were conceived to eradicate employment discrimination and organizations subject to the Employment Equity Act are mandated to adopt them. Their success, however, has been mixed. Although EEPs have resulted in some improvement in the status of women, their success has been overshadowed by complaints of unfairness and employee backlash. Essential measures to eliminate these negative perceptions and improve the effectiveness of EEPs are discussed.

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    Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

    Volume (Year): 28 (2002)
    Issue (Month): s1 (May)
    Pages: 85-100

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    Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:28:y:2002:i:s1:p:85-100
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    1. Louis N. Christofides & Robert Swidinsky, 1994. "Wage Determination by Gender and Visible Minority Status: Evidence from the 1989 LMAS," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 20(1), pages 34-51, March.
    2. Harry Holzer & David Neumark, 1996. "Are Affirmative Action Hires Less Qualified? Evidence from Employer-Employee Data on New Hires," NBER Working Papers 5603, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Heather Antecol & Peter Kuhn, 1999. "Employment Equity Programs and the Job Search Outcomes of Unemployed Men and Women: Actual and Perceived Effects," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(s1), pages 27-45, November.
    4. Harry J. Holzer & David Neumark, 1998. "What Does Affirmative Action Do?," NBER Working Papers 6605, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Gunderson, Morley, 1989. "Male-Female Wage Differentials and Policy Responses," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 27(1), pages 46-72, March.
    6. Joanne D. Leck & Sylvie St. Onge & Isabelle Lalancette, 1995. "Wage Gap Changes among Organizations Subject to the Employment Equity Act," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 21(4), pages 387-400, December.
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