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Improving the Labor Market Outcomes of Minorities: The Role of Employment Quota

  • Nishith Prakash

    (University of Connecticut)

The world's biggest and arguably most aggressive form of employment based affirmative action policy for minorities exists in India. This paper exploits the institutional features of federally mandated employment quota policy to examine its effect on labor market outcomes of two distinct minority groups. My main finding is that employment quota significantly increases the probability of acquiring a salaried job for one minority group and not the other. Their improved employment outcome is also reflected in their higher household consumption expenditure. Overall, the effects vary within each minority group by education, gender, and geographical location. JEL Classification: H40, J21, J31, J45, O10 Key words: Caste, Employment, Wage differentials, Public Sector, India

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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2012-32.

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Length: 53 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2012-32
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Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/

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  1. Harry Holzer & David Neumark, 1999. "Assessing Affirmative Action," NBER Working Papers 7323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Esther Duflo & Raghabendra Chattopadhyay, 2004. "Women as policy makers: Evidence from a randomized policy experiment in india," Framed Field Experiments 00224, The Field Experiments Website.
  3. Marianne Bertrand & Rema Hanna & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2008. "Affirmative Action in Education: Evidence From Engineering College Admissions in India," NBER Working Papers 13926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Caitlin Knowles Myers, 2007. "A Cure for Discrimination? Affirmative Action and the Case of California's Proposition 209," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(3), pages 379-396, April.
  5. John J. Donohue III & James Heckman, 1991. "Continuous Versus Episodic Change: The Impact of Civil Rights Policy on the Economic Status of Blacks," NBER Working Papers 3894, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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