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Wage Determination by Gender and Visible Minority Stutus : Evidence from the 1989 LMAS

  • Christofides, L.N.
  • Swidinsky, R.

The 1989 Labour Market Activity Survey (LMAS) is used to examine the wage implications of membership in groups distinguished by gender and visible minority status. White men, minority men, white women and minority women earn an average hourly wage of $14.73, $12.48, $11.33 and $10.97, respectively. We examine whether these rates and their pair-wise differences can be explained by productivity-related characteristics, and conclude that less then 30 percent of the offered wage differentials between white males-minority females, white males-white females and white males-minority males can be attributed to productivity-related factors. We also conclude that virtually none of the differentials between minority males-white females and white females-minority females can be explained by productivity factors. Approximately 11 percent of the wage differential between minority males and minority females is due to differences in productivity characteristics.

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Paper provided by University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance in its series Working Papers with number 1992-18.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: 1992
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gue:guelph:1992-18
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Web page: https://www.uoguelph.ca/economics/

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  1. Charles M. Beach & Christopher Worswick, 1993. "Is There a Double-Negative Effect on the Earnings of Immigrant Women?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(1), pages 36-53, March.
  2. Peter George & Peter Kuhn, 1994. "The Size and Structure of Native-White Wage Differentials in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 20-42, February.
  3. Borjas, George J, 1985. "Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of Immigrants," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 463-89, October.
  4. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  5. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  6. Gronau, Reuben, 1974. "Wage Comparisons-A Selectivity Bias," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1119-43, Nov.-Dec..
  7. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 1992. "Race and Gender Pay Differentials," NBER Working Papers 4120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
  9. Cotton, Jeremiah, 1988. "On the Decomposition of Wage Differentials," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 236-43, May.
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