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The Brain Drain Between Knowledge-based Economies: the European Human Capital Outflow to the US

Author

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  • Ahmed Tritah

Abstract

This paper uses census data from 1980 to 2006 to study the new European emigration to the US. This emigration is about a small but rising number of individuals. Yet since 1990, emigrants are increasingly selected from the upper tail quality distribution of their source country workforce in terms of education, scientifi c knowledge and, unobservable skills. This nineties surge has been amplifed by the fact that returnees were fewer, older and, if anything, relatively less educated. As for the rationales, I provide preliminary evidence showing that the brain drain refl ects the weakness of demand for skilled labor in Europe. Lately, I show that the technological changes triggered by human capital losses could make these outfl ows increasingly costly for Europe in terms of productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmed Tritah, 2008. "The Brain Drain Between Knowledge-based Economies: the European Human Capital Outflow to the US," Economie Internationale, CEPII research center, issue 115, pages 65-108.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepiei:2008-3tc
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    File URL: http://www.cepii.fr/IE/rev115/ei115c.htm
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1101-1136.
    2. Virginie Coudert & Cécile Couharde, 2009. "Currency Misalignments and Exchange Rate Regimes in Emerging and Developing Countries," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 121-136, February.
    3. Angel de la Fuente & Antonio Ciccone, 2003. "Human capital in a global and knowledge-based economy," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 562.03, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    2. Docquier Frédéric & Rapoport Hillel, 2009. "Documenting the Brain Drain of “La Crème de la Crème”: Three Case-Studies on International Migration at the Upper Tail of the Education Distribution," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, pages 679-705.
    3. Jürgen Janger & Klaus Nowotny, 2014. "Factors Determining Scientists' Job Choice," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 87(1), pages 81-89, January.
    4. Jürgen Janger & Klaus Nowotny, 2013. "Career choices in academia," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 36, WWWforEurope.
    5. N. N., 2014. "WIFO-Monatsberichte, issue 1/2014," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 87(1), January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brain drain; emigration; human capital; Europe-US;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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