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The Brain Drain Between Knowledge-based Economies: the European Human Capital Outflow to the US

  • Ahmed Tritah

This paper uses census data from 1980 to 2006 to study the new European emigration to the US. This emigration is about a small but rising number of individuals. Yet since 1990, emigrants are increasingly selected from the upper tail quality distribution of their source country workforce in terms of education, scientifi c knowledge and, unobservable skills. This nineties surge has been amplifed by the fact that returnees were fewer, older and, if anything, relatively less educated. As for the rationales, I provide preliminary evidence showing that the brain drain refl ects the weakness of demand for skilled labor in Europe. Lately, I show that the technological changes triggered by human capital losses could make these outfl ows increasingly costly for Europe in terms of productivity.

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File URL: http://www.cepii.fr/IE/rev115/ei115c.htm
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Article provided by CEPII research center in its journal Economie Internationale.

Volume (Year): (2008)
Issue (Month): 115 ()
Pages: 65-108

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Handle: RePEc:cii:cepiei:2008-3tc
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  1. Angel de la Fuente & Antonio Ciccone, 2003. "Human capital in a global and knowledge-based economy," Working Papers 70, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  2. Virginie Coudert & Cécile Couharde, 2009. "Currency Misalignments and Exchange Rate Regimes in Emerging and Developing Countries," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(1), pages 121-136, 02.
  3. Alan B. Krueger & Mikael Lindahl, 2000. "Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?," NBER Working Papers 7591, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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