IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Die Bedeutung von Bildung für die Wirtschaftsentwicklung: Eine neue wirtschaftshistorische Forschungsagenda anhand preußischer Kreisdaten, Teil 2

Listed author(s):
  • Ludger Wößmann

    ()

Im ifo Schnelldienst 23/2010 wurde über erste Ergebnisse einer neuen wirtschaftshistorischen Forschungsagenda, die historische Entwicklungsprozesse mit mikroökonometrischen Methoden untersucht, berichtet. Sie greift auf einmaliges Datenmaterial preußischer Volkszählungen zurück, das auf Kreisebene zur Verfügung steht und das gesamte 19. Jahrhundert umspannt. Diese Forschungsagenda wird derzeit vom Bereich Humankapital und Innovation am ifo Institut im Rahmen eines von der Leibniz-Gemeinschaft geförderten umfangreichen Forschungsprojektes zur "Errichtung eines international führenden Zentrums zur empirischen Erforschung der Bedeutung von Bildung für langfristige wirtschaftliche Entwicklungsprozesse" verfolgt. Während sich der erste Teil des Beitrags mit der historischen Bedeutung des Protestantismus für die Bildung auseinandersetzte, beschäftigt sich, darauf aufbauend, der vorliegende zweite Artikel mit der Bedeutung von Bildung für die wirtschaftshistorische Entwicklung. Die bisher vorliegenden Forschungsergebnisse belegen unter anderem, dass protestantische Gebiete nur aufgrund ihrer besseren Bildung wirtschaftlich fortschrittlicher waren. Darüber hinaus war Bildung schon in der ersten Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts ein wichtiger Einflussfaktor für den Industrialisierungsprozess in Preußen. Und schon vor dem demographischen Übergang bestand ein Trade-off zwischen Bildung und Fertilität.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/ZS/ZS-ifo_Schnelldienst/zs-sd-2011/zs-sd-2011-01/ifosd_2011_1_2.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its journal ifo Schnelldienst.

Volume (Year): 64 (2011)
Issue (Month): 01 (01)
Pages: 41-47

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:64:y:2011:i:01:p:41-47
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Poschingerstr. 5, 81679 München

Phone: +49-89-9224-0
Fax: +49-89-985369
Web page: http://www.cesifo-group.de
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Cinnirella, Francesco & Hornung, Erik, 2013. "Landownership Concentration and the Expansion of Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 9730, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Falck, Oliver & Fritsch, Michael & Heblich, Stephan, 2010. "The Phantom of the Opera: Cultural Amenities, Human Capital, and Regional Economic Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 5065, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Sascha O. Becker & Ludger Woessmann, 2009. "Was Weber Wrong? A Human Capital Theory of Protestant Economic History," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 531-596.
  4. Oliver Falck & Christina Guenther & Stephan Heblich & William R. Kerr, 2010. "From Russia with Love: The Impact of Relocated Firms on Incumbent Survival," NBER Working Papers 16141, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Becker, Sascha O. & Cinnirella, Francesco & Wößmann, Ludger, 2012. "The effect of investment in children’s education on fertility in 1816 Prussia," Munich Reprints in Economics 20197, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  6. Eric A. Hanushek & Ludger Woessmann, 2008. "The Role of Cognitive Skills in Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(3), pages 607-668, September.
  7. Matthias Doepke, 2001. "Accounting for Fertility Decline During the Transition to Growth," UCLA Economics Working Papers 804, UCLA Department of Economics.
  8. Cervellati, Matteo & Sunde, Uwe, 2005. "Human capital formation, life expectancy, and the process of development," Munich Reprints in Economics 20083, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  9. Cantoni, Davide, 2013. "The Economic Effects of the Protestant Reformation: Testing the Weber Hypothesis in the German Lands," Discussion Papers in Economics 14811, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  10. Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Lameli, Alfred & Südekum, Jens, 2012. "Dialects, cultural identity, and economic exchange," Munich Reprints in Economics 20568, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  11. Erik Hornung, 2014. "Immigration and the Diffusion of Technology: The Huguenot Diaspora in Prussia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(1), pages 84-122, January.
  12. Claudia Goldin, 2001. "The Human Capital Century and American Leadership: Virtues of the Past," NBER Working Papers 8239, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Sascha Becker & Francesco Cinnirella & Ludger Woessmann, 2010. "The trade-off between fertility and education: evidence from before the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 177-204, September.
  14. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer & Vollrath, Dietrich, 2008. "Inequality in Land Ownership, the Emergence of Human Capital Promoting Institutions and the Great Divergence," CEPR Discussion Papers 6751, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Guinnane, Timothy W., 2010. "The Historical Fertility Transition: A Guide for Economists," Working Papers 84, Yale University, Department of Economics.
  16. Allen,Robert C., 2009. "The British Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521687850, May.
  17. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Introduction to the Economics of Religion," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1465-1495, September.
  18. Jörg Baten & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2007. "Book production and the onset of modern economic growth," Economics Working Papers 1030, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  19. Sascha O. Becker & Katrin Boeckh & Christa Hainz & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "The Empire is Dead, Long Live the Empire! Long-Run Persistence of Trust and Corruption in the Bureaucracy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3392, CESifo Group Munich.
  20. Becker, Sascha O. & Cinnirella, Francesco & Woessmann, Ludger, 2011. "Does Parental Education Affect Fertility? Evidence from Pre-Demographic Transition Prussia," CEPR Discussion Papers 8339, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  21. A'Hearn, Brian & Baten, Jörg & Crayen, Dorothee, 2009. "Quantifying Quantitative Literacy: Age Heaping and the History of Human Capital," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(03), pages 783-808, September.
  22. Becker, Sascha O. & Hornung, Erik & Wößmann, Ludger, 2011. "Education and catch-up in the industrial revolution," Munich Reprints in Economics 20261, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  23. George B. Roberts, Chairman, Universities-National Bureau Committee for Economic Research, 1960. "Demographic and Economic Change in Developed Countries," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number univ60-2, Enero.
  24. Falck, Oliver & Wößmann, Ludger, 2013. "School competition and students’ entrepreneurial intentions: International evidence using historical Catholic roots of private schooling," Munich Reprints in Economics 20629, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  25. Oded_Galor, 2004. "From Stagnation to Growth:Unified Growth Theory," Working Papers 2004-15, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  26. Peter Lindert, 2003. "Voice and Growth: Was Churchill Right?," Working Papers 26, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
  27. Nathan Nunn, 2009. "The Importance of History for Economic Development," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 65-92, 05.
  28. Robert C. Allen, 2003. "Progress and poverty in early modern Europe," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(3), pages 403-443, 08.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:64:y:2011:i:01:p:41-47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Klaus Wohlrabe)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.