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Fatalistic Tendencies: An Explanation of Why People Don't Save

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  • Wu Stephen

    () (Hamilton College)

Abstract

This paper uses data from the 2001 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) and the 2000 World Values Survey (WVS) to analyze the role of fatalism in determining household savings behavior. SCF respondents who feel that luck has played an important role in their financial affairs are more likely to realize their need to save, but are less likely to actually do so. Cross-country evidence from the WVS shows that those who believe they have little freedom and control over their lives are also less likely to save. The results hold after controlling for a number of demographic and behavioral factors, and are consistent across income and wealth levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Wu Stephen, 2005. "Fatalistic Tendencies: An Explanation of Why People Don't Save," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-23, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:contributions.4:y:2005:i:1:n:11
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ann L. Owen & Julio Videras & Stephen Wu, 2012. "More Information Is Not Always Better: The Case Of Voluntary Provision Of Environmental Quality," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 50(3), pages 585-603, July.
    2. Paul Eliccel, 2016. "Culture and Accumulation of Capital : An Empirical study in the Context Haitian Society
      [Culture et accumulation du capital : une étude empirique dans le contexte social haïtien]
      ," Working Papers hal-01555285, HAL.
    3. Shapiro, Joel & Wu, Stephen, 2011. "Fatalism and savings," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 645-651.
    4. Daysal, N. Meltem & Orsini, Chiara, 2012. "Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Health Behavior," IZA Discussion Papers 6409, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Eliccel Paul, 2017. "Culture et accumulation du capital : une étude empirique dans le contexte social haïtien," Working Papers hal-01567104, HAL.

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