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Do Consumers Learn from Their Own Experiences?

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  • Kiichi Tokuoka

Abstract

type="main"> It is natural to think that a household may learn from its own experiences and subsequently increase savings. This paper tests empirically the hypothesis that Japanese households learn from their experiences of large expenditure and increase their targets for precautionary savings after such experiences. The results imply that households raise their targets for precautionary savings by 4–5 percent of annual income in response to such experiences. Moreover, data are consistent with the argument that targets for savings affect actual savings. Assuming this holds, the results in this paper suggest that consumers may increase their actual savings following large expenditure.

Suggested Citation

  • Kiichi Tokuoka, 2015. "Do Consumers Learn from Their Own Experiences?," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 66(4), pages 466-491, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jecrev:v:66:y:2015:i:4:p:466-491
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jere.12062
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    References listed on IDEAS

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