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Collective Trust Behavior

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  • Hakan J. Holm
  • Paul Nystedt

Abstract

This paper investigates trust behavior in situations where decision-makers are large groups and the decision mechanism is collective. Theories from behavioral economics and psychology suggest that trust in such situations may differ from interindividual trust. The experimental results here reveal a large difference in trust but not in trustworthiness between the individual and collective setting. Furthermore, a field experiment captures the determinants of collective trust behavior among two Swedish cohorts. Beliefs about the other group and one's own group are strongly associated with collective trustworthiness and trust behavior. Copyright The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics" 2010 .

Suggested Citation

  • Hakan J. Holm & Paul Nystedt, 2010. "Collective Trust Behavior," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 112(1), pages 25-53, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:112:y:2010:i:1:p:25-53
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Jiro Netzer & Matthias Sutter, 2009. "Intercultural trust. An experiment in Austria and Japan," Working Papers 2009-05, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D70 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - General

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