IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/reviec/v22y2014i1p73-85.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Productivity Gains and Spillovers from Offshoring

Author

Listed:
  • Bernhard Michel
  • François Rycx

Abstract

Offshoring is generally believed to be productivity enhancing and this belief is underpinned by economic theory. This paper estimates the impact of materials and business services offshoring on productivity in Belgium over the period 1995–2004. It contributes to the literature: (i) by examining this issue separately for manufacturing and market services industries and (ii) by investigating the possibility of forward and backward spillovers from offshoring, i.e. that productivity gains from offshoring feed through to upstream and downstream industries. Results show that materials offshoring has no effect on productivity, while business services offshoring leads to productivity gains in manufacturing. Furthermore, there is no evidence of either forward or backward spillovers from offshoring.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernhard Michel & François Rycx, 2014. "Productivity Gains and Spillovers from Offshoring," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(1), pages 73-85, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:22:y:2014:i:1:p:73-85
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/roie.12097
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yasuyuki Todo & Weiying Zhang & Lei‐An Zhou, 2011. "Intra‐industry Knowledge Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment in Research and Development: Evidence from China's “Silicon Valley”," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 569-585, August.
    2. Egger, Peter & Pfaffermayr, Michael & Wolfmayr-Schnitzer, Yvonne, 2001. "The international fragmentation of Austrian manufacturing: The effects of outsourcing on productivity and wages," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 257-272, November.
    3. Feenstra, Robert C & Hanson, Gordon H, 1996. "Globalization, Outsourcing, and Wage Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 240-245, May.
    4. Rosario Crinò, 2008. "Service offshoring and productivity in Western Europe," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 6(35), pages 1-8.
    5. Bernhard Michel & François Rycx, 2012. "Does offshoring of materials and business services affect employment? Evidence from a small open economy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(2), pages 229-251, January.
    6. Calista Cheung & James Rossiter & Yi Zheng, 2008. "Offshoring and Its Effects on the Labour Market and Productivity: A Survey of Recent Literature," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2008(Autumn), pages 17-30.
    7. Keiko Ito & Kiyoyasu Tanaka, 2012. "Does Material and Service Offshoring Improve Domestic Productivity? Evidence from Japanese Manufacturing Industries," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Quantitative Analysis Of Newly Evolving Patterns Of International Trade Fragmentation, Offshoring of Activities, and Vertical Intra-Industry Trade, chapter 2, pages 49-99 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Havranek, Tomas & Irsova, Zuzana, 2011. "Estimating vertical spillovers from FDI: Why results vary and what the true effect is," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 234-244.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Merlevede & Angelos Theodorakopoulos, 2016. "Productivity effects from inter-industry offshoring and inshoring: Firm-level evidence from Belgium," FIW Working Paper series 165, FIW.
    2. Bruno Merlevede & Angelos Theodorakopoulos, 2018. "Productivity Effects Of Internationalisation Through The Domestic Supply Chain: Evidence From Europe," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 18/949, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    3. Aleksandra Parteka & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2015. "Integrated sectors - diversified earnings: the (missing) impact of offshoring on wages and wage convergence in the EU27," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(3), pages 325-350, September.
    4. Ioannis Bournakis & Michela Vecchi & Francesco Venturini, 2018. "Off‐Shoring, Specialization and R&D," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 64(1), pages 26-51, March.
    5. Kummritz,Victor & Taglioni,Daria & Winkler,Deborah Elisabeth & Kummritz,Victor & Taglioni,Daria & Winkler,Deborah Elisabeth, 2017. "Economic upgrading through global value chain participation : which policies increase the value added gains ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8007, The World Bank.
    6. Deborah Winkler & Thomas Farole, 2015. "Global Value Chain Integration and Productivity," World Bank Other Operational Studies 23818, The World Bank.
    7. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:40:y:2018:i:1:p:136-150 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:bla:worlde:v:39:y:2016:i:12:p:2025-2045 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Johannes Pöschl & Neil Foster-McGregor & Robert Stehrer, 2016. "International R&D Spillovers and Business Service Innovation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(12), pages 2025-2045, December.
    10. Mariotti, Sergio & Nicolini, Marcella & Piscitello, Lucia, 2013. "Vertical linkages between foreign MNEs in service sectors and local manufacturing firms," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 133-145.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:22:y:2014:i:1:p:73-85. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley Content Delivery). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0965-7576 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.