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Policy Shifts and Financial Instability in Emerging Markets

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  • Andreas Hoffmann
  • Björn Urbansky

Abstract

We explain periods of financial instability following drastic policy shifts within a Hayekian framework. Hayek emphasized that prices, established via the market process, help market participants to form coherent expectations about the future and coordinate plans with one another. In this paper, we elaborate on how policy shifts may undermine planning based on price signals and exacerbate uncertainty about the future, which can contribute to financial instability. Based on our postulated framework, we clarify how financial liberalization in the 1980s/1990s and the recent discretionary monetary policies in the advanced economies may have contributed to recurring episodes of financial instability in emerging markets. In particular, this paper provides an explanation for (1) why we observe financial instability mainly shortly following financial liberalization, and (2) why financial developments in the emerging markets are sensitive to unexpected monetary policy changes in the advanced countries in the current zero-interest rate environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Hoffmann & Björn Urbansky, 2015. "Policy Shifts and Financial Instability in Emerging Markets," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(3), pages 455-469, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:19:y:2015:i:3:p:455-469
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/rode.12170
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