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Modeling Distribution Services and Assessing Their Welfare Effects in a General Equilibrium Framework


  • Scott Bradford
  • Alexandre Gohin


Most international trade models fail to account for the fact that almost all goods must pass through the distribution sector. The authors compare different approaches to modeling distribution within an Applied General Equilibrium framework and find that such modeling may significantly affect trade opening simulations. They also predict large potential gains from streamlining distribution. For instance, a 10% reduction in Japan's final goods distribution margins would benefit it as much as worldwide free trade would. They also find that, compared to trade opening, reducing margins leads to smaller inter-sectoral production shifts and thus may engender less political opposition. Copyright © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Scott Bradford & Alexandre Gohin, 2006. "Modeling Distribution Services and Assessing Their Welfare Effects in a General Equilibrium Framework," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(1), pages 87-102, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:10:y:2006:i:1:p:87-102

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy, 1994. "The Division of Labor, Coordination Costs, and Knowledge," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 299-322 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. T. Sonobe & D. Hu & K. Otsuka, 2002. "Process of Cluster Formation in China: A Case Study of a Garment Town," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 118-139.
    3. Eiji Yamamura & Tetsushi Sonobe & Keijiro Otsuka, 2003. "Human capital, cluster formation, and international relocation: the case of the garment industry in Japan, 1968--98," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(1), pages 37-56, January.
    4. Henderson, Vernon & Kuncoro, Ari & Turner, Matt, 1995. "Industrial Development in Cities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 1067-1090, October.
    5. Sonobe, Tetsushi & Kawakami, Momoko & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2003. "Changing Roles of Innovation and Imitation in Industrial Development: The Case of the Machine Tool Industry in Taiwan," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(1), pages 103-128, October.
    6. Schmitz, Hubert & Nadvi, Khalid, 1999. "Clustering and Industrialization: Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 1503-1514, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christen, Elisabeth & Francois, Joseph & Hoekman, Bernard, 2012. "CGE modeling of market access in services," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6106, The World Bank.
    2. Robert M´barek & Ivelin Iliev Rizov, 2013. "European Coexistence Bureau. Best Practice Documents for coexistence of genetically modified crops with conventional and organic farming. 3. Coexistence of genetically modified maize and honey product," JRC Working Papers JRC84850, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    3. Christen, Elisabeth & Francois, Joseph & Hoekman, Bernard, 2013. "Computable General Equilibrium Modeling of Market Access in Services," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    4. Piyush Tiwari & Masayuki Doi & Hidekazu Itoh, 2003. "A CGE Analysis of the Potential Impact of Information Technology on the Japanese Economy," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 17-33.

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