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Early Career Mobility and Earnings Profiles of German Apprentices: Theory and Empirical Evidence

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  • Spiros Bougheas
  • Yannis Georgellis

Abstract

We investigate how apprenticeship training affects the early career mobility and earnings profiles of young apprentices in Germany. The heterogeneous quality and nature (whether general or firm specific) of training across firms is expected to be reflected in the post-apprenticeship mobility and earning patterns of young workers. In this paper, we argue that a simple model of training and labour turnover can explain such patterns. Specifically, assuming that job changes are associated with a loss of accumulated firm-specific skills, the model predicts that although movers initially experience a productivity loss, their earnings grow at a faster rate than those of stayers. As job changes become more costly the longer a worker stays with the training firm, later movers experience a larger reduction in their earnings compared with direct movers. Estimated selectivity-corrected earnings equations for movers and stayers, based on data from the German Socioeconomic Panel (GSOEP), support the predictions of the model and highlight important differences in earnings profiles and mobility patterns by apprenticeship firm size. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Spiros Bougheas & Yannis Georgellis, 2004. "Early Career Mobility and Earnings Profiles of German Apprentices: Theory and Empirical Evidence," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 18(2), pages 233-263, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:18:y:2004:i:2:p:233-263
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    Cited by:

    1. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Licklederer, Stefanie & Zwiener, Hanna, 2015. "Mobility across firms and occupations among graduates from apprenticeship," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 138-151.
    2. Riphahn, Regina T. & Zibrowius, Michael, 2015. "Apprenticeship, Vocational Training and Early Labor Market Outcomes in East and West Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 8901, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Barbara Mueller & Juerg Schweri, 2012. "The returns to occupation-specific human capital - Evidence from mobility after training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0081, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    4. James Heckman & Tim Kautz, 2013. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Interventions That Improve Character and Cognition," Working Papers 2013-019, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    5. Regina T. Riphahn & Michael Zibrowius, 2013. "Apprenticeship Training and Early Labor Market Outcomes in East and West Germany," Working Papers 136, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    6. Christian Eggenberger & Miriam Rinawi & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2015. "Occupational Specificity: A new Measurement Based on Training Curricula and its Effect on Labor Market Outcomes," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0106, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised 2018.
    7. Tim Kautz & James J. Heckman & Ron Diris & Bas ter Weel & Lex Borghans, 2014. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Improving Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills to Promote Lifetime Success," NBER Working Papers 20749, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Kathrin Göggel & Thomas Zwick, 2012. "Heterogeneous Wage Effects of Apprenticeship Training," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(3), pages 756-779, September.
    9. Bäker, Agnes, 2015. "Non-tenured post-doctoral researchers’ job mobility and research output: An analysis of the role of research discipline, department size, and coauthors," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 634-650.
    10. Goeggel, Kathrin & Zwick, Thomas, 2009. "Good occupation - bad occupation? The quality of apprenticeship training," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-024, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    11. Alexandre Léné, 2005. "Détournements de main-d'œuvre et externalités de la formation dans un modèle de concurrence imparfaite," Post-Print halshs-00150687, HAL.
    12. By Barbara Mueller & Jürg Schweri, 2015. "How specific is apprenticeship training? Evidence from inter-firm and occupational mobility after graduation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 1057-1077.

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